Starting a Law Firm for Small Law Firms - Strategist
Strategist - The FindLaw Law Firm Business Blog

Recently in Starting a Law Firm Category

Solo attorneys need a marketing presence, and they should know to focus on it.

Still confused about where to get started? FindLaw.com offers a no-hassle marketing solution in the Lawyer Directory, and it's so simple to sign up.

Part of being an effective attorney is zealously advocating for your client. And although you may be the most motivated, competent advocate in the market, no one will know that unless you actually have clients.

So for those still unconvinced of the need for solos to push for marketing, consider this:

Naming your practice can be a puzzling process for many new attorneys seeking to start their own firms. There are ethical concerns, not to mention business interests, to be mindful of before selecting a moniker for your practice.

In order to pick the right one, avoid these five naming mistakes:

We recently saw an interview of Bruce Barket* on Bloomberg Law, where he talked about his experience starting a law firm in the post-recession economy. Bucking industry trends, his firm is not shrinking, but growing.

Here are some tips that we gleaned from his interview on how to start a post-2008, recession-proof law firm.

October is the official month of many things, breast cancer awareness and cyber security awareness, and now we can add something else: National Women's Small Business Month.

While the ABA does not keep tabs on the number of women-owned law firms, American Express states that women-owned business in general are "[t]he only bright spot in recent years with respect to privately held company job growth has been among women-owned firms. They have added an estimated 175,000 jobs to the U.S. economy since 2007," reports Forbes.

To celebrate National Women's Small Business Month, we decided to do a round-up of all the best FindLaw articles related to starting your own firm, and dealing with issues that are unique (or skewed) to women.

Last week we discussed tips and considerations for hiring your first employee. Suppose you already cleared that hurdle and you have a team of administrative staff and paralegals. What if you're ready for the next hurdle -- adding attorneys to your team?

A good way to test the waters is by hiring a contractor. So, here are five reasons why you should consider hiring a contract attorney to grow your small practice.

You've been working as a solo-attorney for a while, but it may be time to actually take the leap and become an employer. Since you need to concentrate on your clients, and billing those hours, you should find someone to help you with administrative tasks like copying and filing and answering phones.

Maybe you want to take it a step further and have someone assist you with drafting letters and research. So now what?

Did Gabriella convince you?

If you're preparing to launch your own small firm practice, you really should have a business plan. The plan should weigh the relevant factors, from practice area to practice location, before you open up shop. A proper law firm business plan may also be a necessity if you are applying for a small business loan to cover startup costs.

If you're suffering from writer's block, despite Gabriella's great advice, here are few more resources to get you started:

Finding good help is always difficult, and sometimes a few bad apples can ruin things for you. But you can't avoid the inevitable -- at some point you'll need to hire a paralegal. You just can't do everything yourself.

So here are some quick, easy tips on how to spot, and hire a great paralegal.

For breakfast, I had a plea deal and four billable hours. For lunch and dinner, I'm having an eight-hour shift of blogging. Why do I do both? My day job allows me to watch Justice Scalia lose his mind and to express outrage at Georgia's attempts to execute a mentally disabled man with bootleg-ish lethal injection drugs. My law practice allows me to help people who otherwise couldn't afford counsel and gives me practice experience.

It has its drawbacks. When cases hit critical states, I can find myself working eighty hour weeks. Billing and collections can be a massive pain, though that is alleviated quite a bit by using modern cloud-practice management software.

If you're practicing for the right reasons, and your day job is amenable to the occasional schedule-shift, practicing part-time is completely feasible. Here are some tips I've learned along the way.