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Justice Ginsburg Promises a 'Momentous' Supreme Court Term

With the U.S. Supreme Court set to open Oct. 2, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is warming up the crowd.

Speaking at Georgetown Law, she promised it will be a "momentous" term with issues such as the President's travel ban, religious freedom, voting rights, and same-sex marriage. But the notorious RBG also entertained, especially when asked how she choose her early career.

"How did I decide to become a flaming feminist litigator?" she posed, evoking smiles and chuckles from the crowd.

Ginsburg to Congress: Stop the Nonsense

When the late Justice Antonin Scalia was appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1986, the U.S. Senate unanimously confirmed him.

In contrast two decades later, nearly two dozen Senators -- voting along party lines -- opposed the nomination of Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr. A pattern of partisan opposition emerged as Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan came before the lawmakers for consideration.

"My hope -- and I hope I will live to see it in this lifetime -- is that our Congress will get over this nonsense," said Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Ginsburg Tells Utah Lawyers to Make a Difference

It's not quite as rare as a solar eclipse, but it is a rare occasion when the U.S. Supreme Court's most liberal justice speaks to lawyers from the most conservative state in the nation.

And it was a moment to applaud, as more than 1,000 attorneys and their families gave a standing ovation to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at a convention of the Utah Bar Association. State Bar president Robert Rice said many lawyers brought their daughters to the event.

"They see her as a role model of not only what young women may be in the legal profession but what lawyers should be and what judges should be," he said.

A Preview of the Ruth Bader Ginsburg Movie

When it comes to movies based on real life, viewers must allow for some literary license.

Even in the upcoming biopic of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the justice would grant Felicity Jones some flexibility in portraying her. After all, the actress is English.

One thing is certain, however. The movie, set to begin filming in September, will hew to the truth that women have had to fight for equal rights in America.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been many things in her long life: an activist, an advocate, a disc jockey, an opera star, not to mention a Supreme Court justice. Now, she's about to add another row to her resume: Justice Ginsburg, spoken-word artist.

That's right, Her Notoriousness has been working on a short spoken-word album, the justice revealed last night at a speech at the Kennedy Center. "Some thoughts can't be expressed in a majority opinion," Ginsburg explained. "Or in an opera, for that matter."

Well, this is awkward. Just as Neil Gorsuch faced a barrage of hard hitting questions for the third day in a row, the Supreme Court overruled him on a controversial opinion from 2008. Senator Dick Durbin took the judge to task over that ruling, where the judge rejected a challenge by the parents of an autistic boy who claimed that his school had failed to provide him the educational services required under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Since the student was making some progress toward his goals, the school had met its legal responsibilities, Gorsuch concluded.

But today, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that more than just de minimis progress was required. Gorsuch learned of the ruling during a brief break, allowing him to address it during his testimony.

You don't get to the Supreme Court without passing through the crucible of a Senate confirmation hearing -- and sometimes you don't get to the Supreme Court even then. But Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's SCOTUS nominee, survived the first day of his hearing relatively unscathed.

Here are the highlights, from the politics to the polyester to pro football.

There's been a lot of talk about Justice Ginsburg's workout regime these days -- the 84-year-old justice does bench 70 pounds, after all. But that's not the only Supreme Court workout worth noting.

While she was on the Court, Justice Sandra Day O'Connor began an early morning workout class at the Court. And she kept it going since then. Until now that is. After more than 35 years, Justice O'Connor's workout class is being forced to relocate.

Happy birthday, RBG! The Supreme Court Justice was born this day in Brooklyn, New York, 84 years ago. She is currently the oldest, and the shortest, member of the Supreme Court.

Justice Ginsburg's age has some worrying that she won't be on the Court for much longer. And whether you agree with her jurisprudence or not, there's no questioning that the Supreme Court wouldn't be the same without Justice Ginsburg. Thankfully, RBG doesn't seem to be going anywhere soon.

A president looking to make his mark on the Supreme Court, the logic goes, should nominate younger jurists for the bench. After all, a Neil Gorsuch, at age 49, is likely to have a few more years of adjudicating before him than, say, a 63-year-old Merrick Garland.

That common sense assumption is an accurate one, of course. Younger justices end up serving longer on average, according to a recent analysis by the Pew Research Center. But there are a few important exceptions.