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Happy Loving Day! June 12th marks the 48th anniversary of the Supreme Court's decision in Loving v. Virginia, which struck down race-based limitations on marriage rights. Loving remains a landmark civil rights case and Loving Day, now in its 13th year, has become the nation's "biggest multiracial celebration," according to Time magazine.

Among lawyers, though, Loving has been getting renewed attention, and not just for its invalidation of state anti-miscegenation laws. The case, which helped strike down some of the last vestiges of official segregation, is now being taken up in the debate over same-sex marriage, where advocates argue that its logic, that the right to marry the one you love is fundamental, should be applied to bans on gay marriage today.

The culture wars are alive and well in the Supreme Court these days, as SCOTUS reviews everything from gay marriage, to affirmative action in higher education and abortion restrictions. It almost feels like it's the 90s again. Perhaps the Court could review the Clinton impeachment when they have a spare moment.

Having released only a single opinion this week -- the important separation of powers and Jerusalem passport case of Zivotofsky -- the Court shouldn't have too much time on its hands. Here's a preview of what might be on the Supreme Court's plate as the term winds down.

The Supreme Court's oral arguments in Obergefell v. Hodges and the recent shootings at the "Draw Muhammad" contest in Texas have led to some pretty interesting theories about how the Constitution works.

In both cases, the interplay of religious liberty, free speech, and the rights of others concern some people out in the world who are afraid of same-sex marriage or of events that are designed to make people angry, like the Draw Muhammad contest. In both cases, however, the fear that the government can bring its hammer down on free expression is unwarranted.

Only a few hours ago, the Court concluded a marathon two-and-a-half hours of oral arguments in Obergefell v. Hodges, the consolidated same-sex marriage cases that undoubtedly form the basis of the big civil rights decision of our time.

The Court divided the arguments according to the two questions presented: First, whether the same-sex marriage bans are unconstitutional, and second, whether Ohio's refusal to acknowledge an out-of-state same sex marriage violates the Full Faith and Credit Clause.

There's no more American holiday than Thanksgiving. (Well, except maybe Independence Day. And doesn't Canada have a Thanksgiving, too?) A day filled with overeating, over-drinking, and then football? Sign me up!

Thanksgiving has popped up over the years at the U.S. Supreme Court as well, though it didn't involve Chief Justice Rehnquist falling asleep on the couch watching the Stanford game. It's mostly involved the "War on Christmas."

So help yourself to this bountiful cornucopia of Supreme Court rulings (OK, we actually only found five) that include Thanksgiving references -- or at least sound like they should:

Opponents of the Affordable Care Act had better look out; in the battle over who's going to punch their SCOTUS "frequent petitioner" card first, Abigail Fisher is a close second.

Fisher, you might remember, was denied admission to the University of Texas at Austin in 2008 and then sued to get in, claiming the state's policy of granting admission to UT to the top 10 percent of graduating students in the state resulted in racial discrimination.

The Fifth Circuit said nope, and the Supreme Court showed marked restraint by not overturning Grutter v. Bollinger like a Lakers fan overturns a police car after a victory.

The Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. "Obamacare," is heading back to the U.S. Supreme Court for a third time. One more trip to the Court and the ACA gets a free Scaliawich from the court cafeteria (though admittedly it's just olives, pickles, onions, and week-old capicola on a very sourdough roll).

The Court has granted cert. to King v. Burwell, a case from the Fourth Circuit dealing with the federal tax subsidies offered in states that didn't set up their own insurance exchanges.

6th Cir. Upholds Gay Marriage Bans: Your Move, SCOTUS

Better late than never, though we're sure the Court would've rather the issue of gay marriage had been addressed never. Avoiding the issue might've been possible, had the circuit courts stayed in concert. Now, the Supreme Court may not have a choice.

A few months back, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said that the Sixth Circuit could force the Court's hand if it upheld gay marriage bans. Yesterday afternoon, it did just that, upholding bans in four states, calling RBG's bluff and putting SCOTUS in for all its chips.

Now, with a circuit split in place, and the ACLU already preparing their petition for certiorari (apparently en banc isn't happening?), the Court has to decide the issue of whether the Fourteenth Amendment guarantees marriage equality -- doesn't it?

Movember? You'll Never Beat These SCOTUS Facial Hair Legends

FindLaw, a part of Thomson Reuters, celebrates Movember because we are awesome. Last year in honor of Movember/No Shave November, we talked about how to survive the month in a professional environment. Trust us: It's worth the read.

Upon laying eyes on Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.'s magnificent stache, however, I couldn't help but wonder: What other legendary Supreme Court facial hair was out there? Sure, today none of the justices consistently rock facial follicles, but what about the grand and glorious past?

We'll start with the notables, move to the complete index of SCOTUS mustaches and beards, and then conduct a poll for G.O.A.T. (not goatee, but rather the Greatest Of All Time):

11 Bits of SCOTUS Trivia From the Yale Trio's Trip to Campus

The Supreme Court's three justices from Yale made the trip back to New Haven, Connecticut, on Saturday to receive the school's Award of Merit. The event was especially sweet for Justice Clarence Thomas, who for a long time has had a cold, estranged relationship with his alma mater. He remarked that the event was "far more special to me than at the time of my graduation."

But the event wasn't just a look into the life of Clarence Thomas. Two other justices, Samuel Alito and Sonia Sotomayor, were also honored. Between the three of them, we learned many interesting things about the SCOTUS Yaleies. Here are 11 notes and trivia bits pulled from The Washington Post and The New York Times' recaps of the event: