Tarnished Twenty - FindLaw Sports Law Blog

Tarnished Twenty - The FindLaw Sports Law Blog - features sports law news and info about sports figures in trouble with the law


You mess with the bull, you get the horns. Some Twitter trolls messed with proud papa Curt Schilling after he tweeted congratulations to his daughter her acceptance to college.

Schilling responded by tracking down and exposing a few choice commenters, one of whom has already been fired, and may follow up by pursuing criminal charges or a civil lawsuit.

Adrian Peterson and the NFL Players Association have won their appeal of Peterson's indefinite suspension. A U.S. District Court judge has overturned an arbitrator's ruling that previously upheld the NFL's suspension of Peterson following his indictment on child abuse charges.

The Peterson ruling comes three months after an arbitrator tossed the league's suspension of Ray Rice, claiming the NFL essentially punished Rice twice for the same offense.

Marshawn Lynch gave the same answer, "I'm just here so I won't get fined," in response to every question during his initial Super Bowl press conference. (He followed that up with a chorus of "You know why I'm here" the next day.) Now the Seattle Seahawks running back is trying to make sure no one else uses the phrase without his permission.

Lynch filed an application last week to trademark the phrase, in an effort to secure exclusive rights to use it on shirts, hats, and other athletic apparel. And if his past trademark endeavors are any indication, the infamous quote will soon be his, legally.

An arbitration panel in Texas has ordered Lance Armstrong to pay SCA Promotions $10 million based largely on his 2013 confession to doping. SCA had sued Armstrong to recoup bonuses it paid the cyclist for his multiple Tour de France victories.

While Armstrong and his lawyers intend to fight the ruling, SCA has asked a Texas state court to confirm the arbitration decision, giving it the status of a legal judgment.

Abebe Bikila shattered the Olympic marathon record in Rome in 1960, running the entire race barefoot. Now his family is suing Vibram, the running shoe company that advertises the "joyful feeling of barefoot running."

The Associated Press is reporting that Bikila's family has filed a lawsuit in federal court in Tacoma, Washington, alleging that Vibram used their deceased relative's name on a shoe without his, or their, permission.

While Vibram trademarked the name "Bikila" in 2010, Bikila's son Teferi asserts the company had no right to use the name in the first place.

The Super Bowl-bound Seattle Seahawks are reportedly trying to use their infamous "12th Man" home-crowd advantage to lead the team to victory at the cash register as well on the field by trademarking several uses of the number "12."

The number "12" -- in reference to the Seattle fans' role as the "12th Man" on the team, after the 11 players on the field -- is just one of the terms the team has trademarked or is trying to, reports The Seattle Times. The team has reportedly filed two dozen trademarks since October 2013 for phrases including "Go Hawks" and the word "boom."

But can the Seahawks really trademark the number "12?"

Two former professional wrestlers have filed a proposed class action brain injury lawsuit against World Wrestling Entertainment.

Vito Lograsso and Evan Singleton -- who wrestled under the names Skull Von Krush and Adam Mercer -- filed the lawsuit in federal court in Philadelphia, Reuters reports. The 50-year-old LoGrasso, who also wrestled under the name Big Vito, was a WWE wrestler from 1991 to 1998 and again from 2005 to 2007. Singleton joined the WWE in 2012 at the age of 19.

What are the men claiming in their lawsuit?

NASCAR driver Kurt Busch testified in court earlier this week that his former girlfriend is a trained assassin hired to kill people around the world.

Busch's eyebrow-raising testimony came during a hearing over a no-contact order requested by Patricia Driscoll, Busch's allegedly deadly ex-girlfriend. As ESPN reports, Busch didn't just make the accusation once during the proceeding, but made the claim repeatedly over the four-day hearing.

What's the story behind Busch's surprising allegations?

Jonathan Martin Tackles a Shoplifter: Citizen's Arrest Basics

NFL offensive lineman Jonathan Martin (who will unfortunately always be known as the guy who quit football temporarily after being bullied by a fellow teammate) is back in the news, but this time he wasn't a victim -- he was the man.

According to Yahoo Sports (and Martin's own tweets), Martin subdued an alleged shoplifter in a Versace store last week. Martin said that he saw the shoplifters and reacted without thinking -- pummeling one of them until he was sufficiently subdued to be taken care of by security.

Martin tweeted about the incident using the hashtag #civicduty, but what do you need to know about citizen's arrests before you exercise that duty?

Jury selection began today in the murder trial of former New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez.

The jury selection marked the first day of a trial that is expected to last anywhere from six to 10 weeks, The Associated Press reports. The trial is also the first of at least two for Hernandez, who is facing additional murder charges in connection with a 2012 double homicide in Boston.

What should you know about Day 1 of Aaron Hernandez's murder trial? Here are five things: