Tarnished Twenty- The FindLaw Sports Law Blog

February 2015 Archives

Adrian Peterson and the NFL Players Association have won their appeal of Peterson's indefinite suspension. A U.S. District Court judge has overturned an arbitrator's ruling that previously upheld the NFL's suspension of Peterson following his indictment on child abuse charges.

The Peterson ruling comes three months after an arbitrator tossed the league's suspension of Ray Rice, claiming the NFL essentially punished Rice twice for the same offense.

Marshawn Lynch gave the same answer, "I'm just here so I won't get fined," in response to every question during his initial Super Bowl press conference. (He followed that up with a chorus of "You know why I'm here" the next day.) Now the Seattle Seahawks running back is trying to make sure no one else uses the phrase without his permission.

Lynch filed an application last week to trademark the phrase, in an effort to secure exclusive rights to use it on shirts, hats, and other athletic apparel. And if his past trademark endeavors are any indication, the infamous quote will soon be his, legally.

An arbitration panel in Texas has ordered Lance Armstrong to pay SCA Promotions $10 million based largely on his 2013 confession to doping. SCA had sued Armstrong to recoup bonuses it paid the cyclist for his multiple Tour de France victories.

While Armstrong and his lawyers intend to fight the ruling, SCA has asked a Texas state court to confirm the arbitration decision, giving it the status of a legal judgment.

Abebe Bikila shattered the Olympic marathon record in Rome in 1960, running the entire race barefoot. Now his family is suing Vibram, the running shoe company that advertises the "joyful feeling of barefoot running."

The Associated Press is reporting that Bikila's family has filed a lawsuit in federal court in Tacoma, Washington, alleging that Vibram used their deceased relative's name on a shoe without his, or their, permission.

While Vibram trademarked the name "Bikila" in 2010, Bikila's son Teferi asserts the company had no right to use the name in the first place.