Tarnished Twenty- The FindLaw Sports Law Blog

August 2017 Archives

If you can remember back that far, in early 2016 a tattoo studio sued a video game company for depicting NBA players' tattoos for which they had allegedly not paid licensing fees. In the realm of fringe copyright lawsuits, this was one of the strangest -- after all, it wasn't the athletes themselves arguing that the game engineers were using the ink on their skin without compensation, but a tattoo studio arguing rights to artists' designs and work.

As it turns out, that battle is still raging in a New York federal court, where the video game company is arguing that its use of the tattoos amounts to fair use under copyright laws.

Fortunately for me, my not-so-illustrious baseball career ended long before being forced to stand in the batter's box while coaches hurled balls at my hip and rib cage, in order to teach me "muscle memory to avoid potential injuries in an actual game." Getting hit with a baseball, even a training ball that is supposedly lightweight and soft, is not a pleasant experience.

Not so pleasant that a mom whose son participated in the drill reported the coaches to the Tennessee Department of Children's Services and the Knox County Sheriff's Office. But after an investigation found no wrongdoing, the coaches have turned the table, suing the mother for defamation, false light, outrageous conduct, and intentional interference with economic advantage.

The battle between Pete Rose, best known for having the most hits all-time in baseball and also being banned from the sport, and John Dowd, best known for preparing the report that got Rose banned, continues, and continues to get ugly. In court documents obtained by ESPN, Rose allegedly had a sexual relationship with a woman for several years in the 1970s that began before she turned 16.

The woman's affidavit is part of a defamation lawsuit filed by Rose against Dowd, who claimed in a 2015 radio interview that the former Cincinnati Reds great had underage girls delivered to him at spring training.

It's possible that Joshua Hanshaw was just a fan looking for some souvenirs when he broke into Appalachian Power Park, home of the Pittsburgh Pirates minor league affiliate, the West Virginia Power. After all, Hanshaw is wearing hitting coach Ryan Long's jersey in his mug shot following his arrest.

But that probably wasn't the case, as the reportedly homeless Hanshaw looted the Power's locker room for almost $4,000 worth of players' personal items like sunglasses, shoes, and toiletries that had been pre-packed for the team's upcoming road trip. Oh, and the jersey, too.