Tarnished Twenty- The FindLaw Sports Law Blog

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It's not often that stadium security has to eject a fan. And a fan would need to work pretty hard to get banned for life from a stadium. Well, dropping a racial slur, then confirming the slur to neighboring fans, just one night after other fans in the stadium made national news for racially abusing a visiting player is hard work enough to get banned for life.

Such was the fate of one Boston Red Sox fan, who was ejected, then banned for life from Fenway Park earlier this month after making a racist remark about a Kenyan woman who had just finished singing the national anthem.

We often use sports as an escape from real life. And every now and then, real life intrudes into the games. That's what happened when a stray bullet found its way into Busch Stadium Tuesday night, grazing a female fan's arm and came to a stop underneath her seat.

Thankfully, the woman was not seriously injured, and according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, has already retained the services of an attorney.

Minor league ball player Ian Kahaloa got in a whole heap of trouble after posting a few short videos on the popular social media site Snapchat. The videos depict Kahaloa snorting a line of white powder while wearing a Reds t-shirt, as well as marijuana and paraphernalia.

The 19 year old player's alleged lack of judgment in his use of Snapchat has sparked some discussion on how players should be engaging on social media responsibly.

Two major league ball players filed suit against the news conglomerate Al Jazeera after a documentary style film aired on their network which authoritatively claimed the two ball players took the performance enhancing drug (PED) Delta 2. The source that claimed knowledge on the documentary later recanted before the film was released. But, nevertheless, the film was aired by Al Jazeera.

The players bringing the suit, Ryan Zimmerman and Ryan Howard, were cleared by an MLB investigation, and have now survived a motion to dismiss their civil lawsuit, at least as to the Al Jazeera network and its producer. The investigative journalist that used a hidden camera to film the source's claim of PED use was dismissed from the defamation lawsuit, as the court found there were no legal grounds to hold him liable for defamation.

A Miami jury convicted agent Bartolo Hernandez and trainer Julio Estrada on conspiracy and alien smuggling charges relating to trafficking Cuban baseball players into the U.S. The trial featured vivid testimony from players who spoke about kidnapping attempts and murder on their way through several Central American countries.

Hernandez and Estrada are facing a combined 50 years in prison -- their sentencing is scheduled for July 11.

Plenty of fans and maybe even some players have had their suspicions that a referee or umpire might be under the influence during a game. Few can say they've seen an official arrested for just that offense while the game was still going on.

Count those attending a Princeville (AL) High School junior varsity baseball game among those few, as umpire Derek Bryant was arrested for public intoxication with just one inning left in the game.

The Minor Leaguers' class action lawsuit against Major League Baseball and various ball clubs over minimum wage violations has been brought back from the dead. The class of Minor League players was decertified back in July of last year due to concerns that relief for the class could not be determined with certainty. The most recent ruling recertifies a new class, which allows the case to move forward, though it is now seeking more narrowly tailored relief.

The primary allegations of the class action suit claim that Minor League players are grossly undercompensated and also do not receive overtime wages from the their employers. These allegations are based on the fact that players are not compensated for off season training, spring training, extended spring training, and instructional leagues, that are essentially required if the players want to play.

Louisville Slugger is probably the most famous name in bat making. But a group of customers are suing the legendary brand, claiming it manufactured a defective bat and then tried to avoid liability by claiming the defect was intentional, to help customers improve their swings.

It's a novel approach, but will it be a home run in court?

While no one expected a repeat of the 1995 Major League Baseball strike, labor negotiations came down to the wire between the MLB and player representatives this week. With little more than 24 hours before the prior player agreement was set to expire, the players and management were able to agree to terms for another five year renewal. Surprisingly though, one of the terms of the new deal prohibits new players from using chewing tobacco, also known as chew, dip, and smokeless tobacco.

This year the family of Tony Gwynn, the famous San Diego Padres player that passed away a few years back due to cancer in his salivary glands, filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the manufacturers of the smokeless tobacco products. Gwynn's cancer was attributed largely to his 30+ years of using chewing tobacco. While Gwynn's untimely death at the age of 54 can't be undone, the MLB seems to be taking a big step toward disassociating chewing tobacco from baseball, which has been used by players since the very beginning.

Baseball's postseason is upon us (sorry, Mets fans), and players, coaches, and fans will be working around the clock to try and make sure their teams win. And at least two of those three will be adequately compensated for the time they put in. (Heartbreak is its own reward for fans.)

But what about the players on their way to the Big Show? Or the concession workers that make sure the show goes on without a hitch? A new court ruling and new proposed legislation could mean that they don't get overtime pay like other professions. Here's a look into the legal dugout.