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The response to San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick's decision to kneel during the national anthem has ranged from support -- from teammates, other NFL players, and even athletes in other sports -- to condemnation -- from aging rock stars and presidential candidates. And some of that response hasn't been so lighthearted.

Kaepernick says he's gotten death threats on social media and "a couple of different avenues." And if you needed a reminder, death threats are not OK -- not in terms of acceptable adult behavior and not legally, either.

NCAA Gives Immunity to Recruits That Said No to Ole Miss

Ole Miss has been under investigation stemming back to before Laremy Tunsil's social media account was hacked, releasing the infamous video of him using a marijuana gas mask-style pipe. Ole Miss already had some recent setbacks due to the NCAA. During the 2015 season, Tunsil sat out for seven games because he accepted prohibited benefits. Another player, Robert Nkemdiche, was suspended from the Sugar Bowl after being charged with possession of marijuana.

Now, according to sources for Yahoo! Sports, the NCAA is investigating Ole Miss's recruiting tactics. The investigation into the Ole Miss football program has expanded beyond the allegations that surfaced surrounding Tunsil. Ole Miss is no stranger to controversy and bad press, and student athletes at rival schools have now been interviewed about the Rebels' recruiting tactics.

NFL players and the NFL Players Association have long complained that Commissioner Roger Goodell is acting as judge, jury, and executioner under the league's disciplinary system. But every now and then, his decisions are reviewed by other, real judges. And in almost all of those cases, the judges side with Goodell and the NFL.

Last month, it was the Second Circuit Court of Appeals reinstating Tom Brady's punishment in Deflategate. And this week, it's the Eighth Circuit upholding Adrian Peterson's suspension and fines from a child-beating incident in 2014. In both cases, federal courts basically told players and their union, "Hey, you get what you bargain for."

The NFL, along with most other major sports leagues, has been happy to distinguish between drugs it calls performance enhancing and those that are performance enabling. The former, like HGH, steroids, and masking agents, are strictly prohibited and will get you suspended. The latter, like cortisone, Toradol, and other anti-inflammatories and painkillers, are apparently tossed out like candy -- anything to get you back on the field. Without those drugs, many players would be too hurt to play, something their coaches, trainers, doctors, and other team employees simply couldn't abide.

A recent lawsuit is now pulling this practice out of dungeon-like training rooms and into the courthouse light. Etopia Evans, widow of the former Minnesota Viking and Baltimore Raven Charles "Chuck" Evans, is suing every NFL team for illegally pushing painkillers on their players, and alleging misconduct as far back as the 1960s. Here's a look at the lawsuit.

Johnny Manziel's legal problems are no secret. And when it's not the 23-year-old former Browns quarterback getting himself in trouble, it's his lawyer. Already facing misdemeanor charges for assaulting his ex-girlfriend, Manziel was allegedly the victim of a hit-and-run last week. And when the AP reached out to his lawyer for comment, Robert Hinton spilled a whole lot of beans about his client.

"Heaven help us if one of the conditions is to pee in a bottle," the attorney texted the AP last week, before going into detail about a receipt allegedly detailing thousands of dollars worth of merchandise purchased from a Dallas marijuana shop. In the least surprising news ever, Hinton has withdrawn from further representing Manziel.

Baylor Football Coach Fired Over Handling of Player Assault Allegations

A Baptist university in Waco, Texas this week demoted the school president and fired the Baylor Bears football coach after an external review of the handling of sexual abuse allegations, including against football players, proved highly problematic. Independent investigators found that Baylor authorities ignored abuse reports in violation of federal law, according to ESPN.

The now-demoted Baylor president, Kenneth Starr (best known for his investigation of Bill Clinton), apologized to sexual assault victims for his previous indifference, saying he was sorry they were not treated with the care, concern, and support they deserve. Baylor's board of regents too expressed dismay. Let's see what independent investigators found and what the school had to say.

After being indicted on misdemeanor domestic assault charges last week, Johnny Manziel turned himself in to Highland Park police in Texas yesterday, posing for a mug shot and posting $1,500 bond before being released. The former Texas A&M Aggies and Cleveland Browns QB is scheduled to appear back in court this morning.

The charge stems from a January incident during which Manziel’s then girlfriend Colleen Crowley claims he restrained, beat, and threatened to kill her.

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals has overturned a lower court ruling and reinstated the Roger Goodell's four-game suspension of Tom Brady in response to his involvement in a scheme to deflate game balls before the 2014-15 AFC Championship game. An NFL-funded investigation last year determined it was "more probable than not" that Patriots personnel altered game balls and that Brady was likely involved.

Brady and the NFL Players Association challenged the suspension on evidentiary and procedural grounds, but he's running out of options to have the suspension overturned again. So what happens next?

Nobody likes NFL games on Thursday night. Teams don't like them. Players don't like them. The media don't like them. And fans don't like them. Nobody likes NFL games on Thursday night except for the league, and Twitter, apparently.

The ever-evolving social media app allegedly plunked down $10 million for the right to stream 10 Thursday night NFL games during the 2016-17 season. Considering the NFL started the bidding at $250 million, that's a cut-rate price to air a product most people want cut from the schedule entirely.

It's been a bad month for the NFL and its concussion problem. Earlier in the month, the NFL's senior vice president for health and safety admitted that there was "certainly" a link between playing football and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Then last week The New York Times exposed the NFL's already flawed concussion research as being even worse than previously believed.

Now, a new lawsuit (filed by an old plaintiff) is citing this new evidence as the basis for new litigation.