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It's a story we've heard too many times to count now. From the NFL down to the high school ranks, and from soccer players to the marching band, it seems like the injuries, and deaths, tied to hazing will never cease.

The most recent tale comes from a school you might not expect: the University of Virginia. Often touted as one of the best public universities in the country -- it ranks in U.S. News and World Reports top 10 for 2017 -- UVA is easily more well-known for its off-the-field academic accomplishments than for anything its football team has won. But it seems like the pervasiveness of sports team hazing can even infect a prestigious university. Here's Aidan Howard's story.

Most sports leagues might be excited to see a GIF or Vine of an awesome play go viral -- after all, that's like free advertising for your product, right? But most sports leagues aren't the NFL, and last week the media behemoth took further steps to protect its trademark on even the smallest snippets of game action.

Under the NFL's new social media policy, its own teams can be fined for posting its own video of games on social media, and are barred from using streaming apps like Facebook Live and Periscope to stream in-stadium footage. And violations of the new rules could quickly lead to six-digit fines. Here's a look.

Former Houston Texans and Philadelphia Eagles linebacker DeMeco Ryans had carved out a nice NFL career from 2006 and 2014. Ryans was the AP NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year in 2006, made the Pro Bowl in 2007 and 2009, served as a captain in Houston and racked up racked up 939 tackles, 13.5 sacks, and 7 interceptions in his career. Ryans even led the Eagles in tackles his last two seasons.

So by all accounts his illustrious career would've continued, had he not torn his Achilles tendon during a visit to his former team in Houston. Ryans was not the first injured player to complain about Houston's turf problems, and he's now the second to sue them over it.

On the heels of the recent concussion controversy for collegiate and professional football players, numerous lawsuits have been filed by former college football players against the NCAA and their respective colleges. The lawsuits allege that the students suffered injuries as a result of their concussions being improperly handled by the school's coaching and athletics personnel. This past July, a federal judge granted preliminary approval to a $75 million class action settlement against the NCAA for their mishandling of concussions. The settlement, however, did not close the door on all the individual injury claims.

Since the settlement, more individual claims have been filed, including seven additional lawsuits by former players filed in August. This month, ESPN is reporting that the number of cases against the NCAA over the concussion scandal has risen to a whopping 43 individual cases.

New York recently passed a law allowing fantasy sports gaming to continue. This new law is now facing a legal challenge by an anti-gambling group.

Last November, NY Attorney General Schneiderman issued an opinion stating that sites like FanDuel and DraftKings were violating the state's gambling laws. Shortly after the sites stopped operating in NY, the state legislature passed a bill that removed fantasy sports gaming from the state's definition of gambling. The bill characterizes fantasy sports gaming as a game of skill rather than chance, and lays the framework for the state to regulate and tax the big money fantasy sports industry.

The Washington Redskins have faced criticism for decades about their team name and logo being offensive to Native Americans, as the term "Redskins" carries a pejorative meaning and tone. The US Patent and Trademark Office allowed the trademark to be registered half a dozen times in the past. However, in 2014, the USPTO cancelled the prior trademarks and refused to register it again, citing that the name is disparaging to Native Americans.

While the Washington Redskins case is still being appealed in the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, and thus is not ripe for the Supreme Court to decide, a similar case will be decided this term (assuming there isn't a 4-4 split).

The response to San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick's decision to kneel during the national anthem has ranged from support -- from teammates, other NFL players, and even athletes in other sports -- to condemnation -- from aging rock stars and presidential candidates. And some of that response hasn't been so lighthearted.

Kaepernick says he's gotten death threats on social media and "a couple of different avenues." And if you needed a reminder, death threats are not OK -- not in terms of acceptable adult behavior and not legally, either.

Ole Miss has been under investigation stemming back to before Laremy Tunsil's social media account was hacked, releasing the infamous video of him using a marijuana gas mask-style pipe. Ole Miss already had some recent setbacks due to the NCAA. During the 2015 season, Tunsil sat out for seven games because he accepted prohibited benefits. Another player, Robert Nkemdiche, was suspended from the Sugar Bowl after being charged with possession of marijuana.

Now, according to sources for Yahoo! Sports, the NCAA is investigating Ole Miss's recruiting tactics. The investigation into the Ole Miss football program has expanded beyond the allegations that surfaced surrounding Tunsil. Ole Miss is no stranger to controversy and bad press, and student athletes at rival schools have now been interviewed about the Rebels' recruiting tactics.

NFL players and the NFL Players Association have long complained that Commissioner Roger Goodell is acting as judge, jury, and executioner under the league's disciplinary system. But every now and then, his decisions are reviewed by other, real judges. And in almost all of those cases, the judges side with Goodell and the NFL.

Last month, it was the Second Circuit Court of Appeals reinstating Tom Brady's punishment in Deflategate. And this week, it's the Eighth Circuit upholding Adrian Peterson's suspension and fines from a child-beating incident in 2014. In both cases, federal courts basically told players and their union, "Hey, you get what you bargain for."

The NFL, along with most other major sports leagues, has been happy to distinguish between drugs it calls performance enhancing and those that are performance enabling. The former, like HGH, steroids, and masking agents, are strictly prohibited and will get you suspended. The latter, like cortisone, Toradol, and other anti-inflammatories and painkillers, are apparently tossed out like candy -- anything to get you back on the field. Without those drugs, many players would be too hurt to play, something their coaches, trainers, doctors, and other team employees simply couldn't abide.

A recent lawsuit is now pulling this practice out of dungeon-like training rooms and into the courthouse light. Etopia Evans, widow of the former Minnesota Viking and Baltimore Raven Charles "Chuck" Evans, is suing every NFL team for illegally pushing painkillers on their players, and alleging misconduct as far back as the 1960s. Here's a look at the lawsuit.