Tarnished Twenty: Other Sports Archives
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Abebe Bikila shattered the Olympic marathon record in Rome in 1960, running the entire race barefoot. Now his family is suing Vibram, the running shoe company that advertises the "joyful feeling of barefoot running."

The Associated Press is reporting that Bikila's family has filed a lawsuit in federal court in Tacoma, Washington, alleging that Vibram used their deceased relative's name on a shoe without his, or their, permission.

While Vibram trademarked the name "Bikila" in 2010, Bikila's son Teferi asserts the company had no right to use the name in the first place.

Two former professional wrestlers have filed a proposed class action brain injury lawsuit against World Wrestling Entertainment.

Vito Lograsso and Evan Singleton -- who wrestled under the names Skull Von Krush and Adam Mercer -- filed the lawsuit in federal court in Philadelphia, Reuters reports. The 50-year-old LoGrasso, who also wrestled under the name Big Vito, was a WWE wrestler from 1991 to 1998 and again from 2005 to 2007. Singleton joined the WWE in 2012 at the age of 19.

What are the men claiming in their lawsuit?

Sports and law intersect more often than one may expect. In 2014, several high-profile athletes were charged with crimes or involved in criminal proceedings. But legal troubles weren't just limited to athletes. Cheerleaders and team owners also got into the mix with headline-grabbing legal issues of their own.

What were this year's biggest sports-related legal stories? Here are the 10 most popular posts from FindLaw's Tarnished Twenty in 2014:

Olympic gold-medal swimmer Michael Phelps pleaded guilty to driving under the influence in a Baltimore court this morning.

The swimmer appeared in court after being arrested on September 30 for DUI, reports The Associated Press. Following his arrest, Phelps' attorney told the court that the 18-time gold medal winner had enrolled in a 45-day treatment program in Arizona and had continued attending Alcoholics Anonymous meetings upon his return to Maryland.

Was Phelps' contrition enough to keep him out of jail?

The owners of the Ultimate Fighting Championship are being sued by current and former UFC fighters over claims that the company violated antitrust laws.

Zuffa LLC, the parent company of the UFC, was sued in California state court on Tuesday, alleging that it prevented fighters from working with other mixed martial arts (MMA) promoters and made itself a monopoly. According to ESPN, the Federal Trade Commission started investigating the UFC for antitrust violations in 2011, but stopped in early 2012.

What are the specific claims of this UFC lawsuit, and what do the fighters want?

The Federal Aviation Administration is cracking down on the use of drones near major sporting events.

Regulating the airspace around sporting events isn't new. Following the 9/11 attacks in 2001, the FAA designated stadiums as national defense airspace, prohibiting aircraft from coming within 3 miles or under 3,000 feet of stadiums during games, reports The Verge. But the agency recently clarified how this rule affects the use of remote controlled and unmanned drones.

What does the FAA's recent rule update mean for drone enthusiasts considering bringing their RC aircraft to a sporting event?

The Federal Communications Commission has repealed its sports blackout rules, calling the regulations "outdated."

In a press release, the FCC announced that it was doing away with rules that prohibited cable and satellite operators from airing sports events that had been blacked out on a local broadcast station. That rule may be most commonly associated with NFL games; the NFL's current policy requires local stations to black out games that does not sell a certain percentage of tickets 72 hours before the game.

How will this rule change affect blackouts in your area?

Jim Thorpe was probably one of the best American athletes of the 20th century: He won Olympic gold medals in 1912 for both pentathlon and decathlon, and he played football, basketball, and baseball (did Bo know all that?). His sports career ended about when the Great Depression started, and he had trouble finding work. He became an alcoholic and died intestate (without a will) in 1953.

So why is it that, 61 years later, Thorpe's children and a Pennsylvania town that Thorpe had never been to are fighting over his remains in federal court?

South African Olympic track star Oscar Pistorius has been sentenced to five years in prison for the killing of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.

The double-amputee athlete, known as the "Blade Runner" for his distinctive prosthetic legs, was the first athlete to compete in both the Olympic and Paralympic games. After being charged with murder in the 2013 shooting death of Steenkamp, Pistorius was found guilty last month on the lesser charge of culpable homicide. Today, Pistorius was sentenced to five years in prison, though he may end up serving the majority of that sentence under house arrest, reports The New York Times.

Here are five things to know about Pistorius' five-year sentence:

Swimmer Michael Phelps, who holds the all-time record for winning Olympic gold medals, apparently likes to go fast out of the water as well. Phelps was pulled over in Baltimore early this morning after being clocked going 84 mph in a 45-mph zone inside the Fort McHenry Tunnel.

But the speeding violation may end up being the least of Phelps' problems. After failing a field sobriety test, officers tested Phelps' blood alcohol concentration and found it twice the legal limit of 0.08 percent, reports TMZ.

Phelps was subsequently booked for DUI before being released. And unfortunately for Phelps, this is not his first arrest for DUI in Maryland.