Technologist - FindLaw Legal Technology Blog

Technologist - The FindLaw Legal Technology Blog


Has Google done you wrong? Well, then Hausfeld, an international plaintiff's firm, wants to hear from you. The firm, known for its high-profile class actions, recently launched a platform to help individuals and businesses pursue potential lawsuits against Google.

The Google Redress & Integrity Platform, or GRIP, is specifically aimed at those harmed by the tech company's allegedly anticompetitive behavior in Europe. In April, the European Commission accused Google of abusing its search dominance in violation of European antitrust laws. That action could bring up to $6 billion in fines and, Hausfeld hopes, spawn a slew of civil suits.

FTC - the Federal Internet Cop

FindLaw columnist Eric Sinrod writes regularly in this section on legal developments surrounding technology and the Internet.

The Internet brings people together in all sorts of new ways. And when people come together, there can be all sorts of problems. So, is there a federal watchdog looking out for the rights of consumers in cyberspace? The answer is "yes" -- the Federal Trade Commission (the FTC).

The FTC was created in 1914, long before the Internet, to prevent unfair methods of competition in commerce. The Federal Trade Commission Act later expanded the authority of the FTC to police unfair and deceptive acts or practices generally.

Here's something new for your ear: podcasts for lawyers. If you're the type of attorney who likes to listen to talk radio while you put together motions or play Brahms while you brief, then lawyer podcasts can offer an enjoyable, educational addition to your playlist. Or, if you're less of a multitasker, podcasts can liven up your downtime, giving you something interesting to listen to on your commute or at the gym.

Legal-focused podcasts aren't just entertaining either. They're informative, inspiring, even instructional. Think of a blog, but without all that pesky reading. Check out our top three:

Most lawyers communicate primarily through email. At the same time, lawyers need to take reasonable efforts to prevent disclosure of client communications and information. Are these two things in conflict? Potentially.

It's fair to say that email isn't the world's most secure communication system. For one, the NSA regularly intercepts attorney-client emails, by its own admission. Then there's the risks posed by hackers, by snooping email tracking software, by your firm's noisy IT intern. Don't worry though -- you needn't abandon email and strap on a tin foil hat. Not yet at least. There's still several easy ways to make your attorney-client emails more secure.

Forget filing your discovery documents away in some basement storage closet or backing them up in piles of external hard drives. Logikcull, the eDiscovery company, is promising that it will reduce discovery archiving to its simplest form: a single drag and drop.

The company is offering one-step, cloud-based data archiving for users of its discovery automation products. That could make archiving as simple as uploading a photo to Facebook and doc review about as complicated as a Google search. And it won't cost you a million dollars either -- Logikcull announced early this August that it's allowing unlimited cloud-based data storage for its customers.

The Perils of Online Dating

FindLaw columnist Eric Sinrod writes regularly in this section on legal developments surrounding technology and the Internet.

Once upon a time, people didn't require Internet access to find a date. The old-fashioned dating scene involved socializing with friends, attending community events, and spending Friday nights at parties and bars. That still happens, of course, but with the Internet, there are now unlimited hook-up options available right at your fingertips.

Dating sites like eHarmony and Match.com boast that many users have found loving, long-lasting relationships through ther dating services. Those couples likely would not have resulted without those web sites. Bravo -- that is fantastic.

Your tweets, never very private to begin with, are about to get much more public. Google, the Goliath search engine company starting integrating tweets into its desktop search results this weekend. They've been experimenting with Twitter content for awhile now, but they only began to show tweets in all English language desktop searches starting last Friday.

Since Google controls two thirds of the world's search traffic, that means that your tweets could end up in front of a lot more than just Twitter's somewhat insular community. With that in mind, here's a look at what's changed along with some best practices for lawyers who tweet.

The legal community now has its own platform for sharing anonymous data on cybersecurity threats. The forum, the Legal Services Information Sharing and Analysis Organization, launched this Wednesday and should help the legal industry collaborate on and avoid security threats.

As we are fond of reminding our readers, cybersecurity threats are a major issue, threatening everyone from adulterers to government workers to adulterous government lawyers. Law firms are no exception. Eighty out of the 100 largest U.S. firms have been hacked over the past four years according to a report by cybersecurity consulting firm Mandiant.

You don't have to lose touch just because you're telecommuting, traveling to meet a client, or on your way to court. If you're one of those lawyers whose work takes them out of the office frequently, there are plenty of mobile-based options that allow you to keep on top of projects while on the go.

And you don't have to shell out hundreds of dollars for them either. Mobile-friendly project management apps can help you organize, monitor and track your law firm's projects, step by step, without costing you a cent -- at least not at the start. Here's an overview of three of our favorites, all of which can be used online, on iPhones and iPads or on Android devices.

FindLaw columnist Eric Sinrod writes regularly in this section on legal developments surrounding technology and the Internet.

Many college students likely would covet an internship at Facebook. One Harvard University student landed such an internship. However, he says that the internship offer to him was rescinded by Facebook because he reportedly exposed privacy flaws in Facebook's mobile messenger. Is that correct or not, and what lesson has been learned?

Harvard student, Aran Khanna, launched a browser application from his dorm room. The app revealed that Facebook Messenger users were able to precisely pinpoint the geographic locations of people with whom they were communicating, as reported by The Guardian.