Is One-Stop Shopping A Reality On The Internet? - Technologist
Technologist - The FindLaw Legal Technology Blog

Is One-Stop Shopping A Reality On The Internet?

FindLaw columnist Eric Sinrod writes regularly in this section on legal developments surrounding technology and the internet.

A Web site ideally is "sticky."  This means that the site attracts consumers who visit frequently and spend significant time and hopefully money on the site.  

Even better, the site also caters to so many of a consumer's needs and interests in a given space that the consumer will not go elsewhere on the Internet.

Along comes www.MakeItPro.com, as an example.  According to its press release, MakeItPro has just launched "the world's only online, interactive all-sport destination, marketplace and resource center for athletes and fans of more than 175 sports worldwide."
Indeed, the marketing materials tout MakeItPro as "the ultimate sports showcase where anyone can connect with athletes of all levels, fans, coaches and parents around the world in a safe, educational and social community."  

Jill Osur, the CEO, Founder and President of MakeItPro comes right out and says that "MakeItPro is the solution for having to visit multiple sites for all of your sports needs."

MakeItPro does have support from some big name athletes like NBA All-Star and two-time league Most Valuable Player Steve Nash.  And it does allow for free registration and permits members to socialize, manage team events and schedules, gain information from sports professionals, and not surprisingly, to purchase services products, all of which can have consumer value.  

Moreover, MakeItPro intends to initiate a mobile messaging platform so that its array of products and services can be mobilized, globalized and monetized.  MakeItPro states that its platform will be compatible with existing technologies for purposes of emailing, texting, downloading of music and videos, and receiving mobile alerts.

Plainly, MakeItPro might generate real interest in its sports niche and it may prove to be successful from a business and consumer standpoint.  

But that begs the question as to whether it will end up being a one-stop sports shop on the Internet, and whether other sites in other niches will do the same.  

While it is true that some Internet users might find it desirable to fulfill all of their needs and interests in one area of their online life at one Internet site, this author believes that for many users that will not be true.

Part of the vibrancy and greatness of the Internet is its tremendous diversity of offerings and flexibility.  There are many Internet users who love being online precisely so that they can cruise a number of different sites, even within one area of interest.  This likely will remain true for them no matter how robust and deep one given site may be within that area.  Plus, in certain niches, there certainly are a number of rich sites to visit.

None of this is meant as a slight with respect to MakeItPro - may it live long and prosper.  Indeed, hopefully it will boast later of some of its young members ultimately making it as professional athletes in part because of MakeItPro.

Eric Sinrod is a partner in the San Francisco office of Duane Morris LLP (http://www.duanemorris.com) where he focuses on litigation matters of various types, including information technology and intellectual property disputes.  His Web site is http://www.sinrodlaw.com and he can be reached at ejsinrod@duanemorris.com.  To receive a weekly email link to Mr. Sinrod's columns, please send an email to him with Subscribe in the Subject line.

This column is prepared and published for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.  The views expressed in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the author's law firm or its individual partners.