Congrats to Thomson Reuters: Big Wins at NLJ Readers' Rankings - Technologist
Technologist - The FindLaw Legal Technology Blog

Congrats to Thomson Reuters: Big Wins at NLJ Readers' Rankings

It's always great to see your teammates recognized for hard work and significant achievements. As a FindLaw flunky, (we're the adopted child of Thomson Reuters and sibling company to Westlaw), I would like to take this opportunity to recognize the various company products that were honored by The National Law Journal's Readers' Rankings.

Westlaw Next is not only one of the biggest names in the legal research game, but it's also the Best Legal Research Vendor for the second consecutive year. It also ranked #1 for it's iPad App and was recognized as the Best Solo Firm/Solo Practitioner Research Vendor. KeyCite took the top spot in Legal Citators and Westlaw Drafting Assistant was named the Best Tables of Authority Solution.

Whew. That's a lot of Westlaw love.

As for our other corporate relatives, Thomson Reuters Elite was recognized as the Best Time & Billing Solution and ProLaw was #1 for Docketing Solutions.

The rankings were based on over 5,000 responses to a survey of 70 categories distributed to NLJ readers.

That's not all of the Thomson Reuters/Westlaw news. For the last couple months, we've been teasing new Firm Central cloud practice management platform, which -- in addition to traditional tasks like billing and calendaring -- integrates legal research and form building into an all-in-one solution.

We finally got our hands on a copy, and after we have a chance to give it a full stress-test, we will be sharing our brutally-honest thoughts on the platform's ambitious and exciting feature set in the coming weeks.

Again, congratulations to all of those whose hard work led to the products that were recognized by the National Law Journal.

Disclaimer: As we mentioned above repeatedly, Thomson Reuters, FindLaw (that's us), and WestLaw are all part of the same company. We're all friends, or to put it more accurately, corporate family. And yes, corporations are people. Just ask SCOTUS.

Related Resources: