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Microsoft's New Server Can Serve Lawyers

One thing for sure about the future of legal tech, there will be upgrades.

In that tradition, Microsoft has announced its newest edition of SQL 2017 -- a server that features software upgrades that may serve lawyers well. It is not a lawyer product, per se, but it has tools that can help attorneys manage their workloads.

The most promising features for the legal profession, according to reports, are improved analytics and artificial intelligence that may even predict outcomes.

Predicting the Future?

"Could SQL 2017, with the right data, predict such things as the chances of a jury verdict or court ruling?" the Lawyerist poses.

Stephen Embry, writing for the website, answers that the server has artificial intelligence that may actually predict the future. With the right data, SQL 2017 could better examine billing rates, success rates of lawyers and even the proclivities of judges.

He says that law firms have access to massive amounts of government and business data, which the server can analyze in many ways. He said the opportunity to form a super-database for legal analytics could be "quite significant to the legal profession."

While other legal tech products already offer smart software, Microsoft SQL 2017 is apparently the first commercial database with built-in deep learning and artificial intelligence.

The Future Preview

Microsoft offers a preview of the server, along with updates, on its website. Among other improvements, SQL 2017 says:

  • It can be used with Linux-based platforms, like iOS, so Apple users and others can use it.
  • It has faster migration tools to move large databases, including to the Cloud and back.
  • It will have face-recognition and other cognitive services to make it work easier and faster.

The company also provides video tutorials, including a description about how to secure applications with SQL server. Data breaches are estimated to increase four times to $2.1 trillion by 2019, the program says.

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