Technologist - The FindLaw Legal Technology Blog

Will AI Find Your Next Legal Job?

The smart robot taketh away, and the smart robot giveth.

That's not scripture, but it will do when work is hard to find. Google, which has launched a new feature on its search page, will help lawyers find jobs.

At a time when artificial intelligence is taking law jobs, it's certainly a blessing that AI also finds work for attorneys. Here's how it works:

Jobs Bar

Open Google and type in the job you want, like "tech lawyer jobs" in the search field. It will search across virtually all the major online job boards and list them under a blue "Jobs" bar.

Google lists those jobs that are physically closest to you, and organizes the results in categories, such as "associate," "counsel," "corporate counsel," etc. You can customize your search by selecting a category.

You can also filter by city, date posted, company type, etc. It features a "job alerts" tool, so that you can tell the program to send you a notice when a job meeting your criteria comes up.

"The idea here is to give job seekers an easy way to see which jobs are available without having to go to multiple sites only to find duplicate postings and lots of irrelevant jobs," says Tech Crunch.

Smart Results

Google sorts out duplicates that employers post to the major job sites, then predictive algorithms organize them for the user. Once you find a job, the search engine directs you to the link with the most complete job listing.

"We hope this will act as an incentive for sites to share all the pertinent details in their listings for job seekers," Google reported.

Machine learning and predictive algorithms are also helping employers sort through applications. They use AI to assess candidates before prospective employees get an interview.

Soon enough, the process of hiring may sound like this: "My algorithms will talk to your algorithms, and we'll get back to you."

Related Resources:

FindLaw has an affiliate relationship with Indeed, earning a small amount of money each time someone uses Indeed's services via FindLaw. FindLaw receives no compensation in exchange for editorial coverage.