Technologist - The FindLaw Legal Technology Blog

Can Patreon Help Fund Your Legal Endeavors?

Perhaps you've heard of Patreon, the crowd-funding site that helps online artists and content creators establish a monthly income from masses of low-level subscribers. The website allows content creators to make profile pages and request support for their creative endeavors in the form of pledges. In return for their pledges, supporters are often treated to exclusive content or other rewards. But most of the supporters don't do it for the swag; they support their favorite content creators in order to see them continue to thrive and create.

Okay, so now that you know what Patreon is, you must be thinking: Is there a way for me fund my endeavors in the legal field?

Fortunately, there is, but there are definitely some exceptions.

This Isn't Litigation Funding

Unlike other crowd-funding sites, Patreon is more geared towards artistic pursuits and entertainment. For instance, one of the bigger user bases of Patreon are video game streamers. Yes, people actually stream video of themselves playing video games online, and if that wasn't unbelievable enough, other people actually watch those live and after-the-fact. And get this: there are people who actually give money to the video game streamers so that they can continue to stream video games online as an actual job. The average video game streamer can apparently make $2K to $5K a month.

However, one notable lawyer on Patreon is the "Boozy Barrister," an anonymous lawyer blogger who tends to write rather amusing content. Sadly, the assumed almost-always-inebriated lawyer blogger is only pulling in $128 per month (as of this writing).

Funding Creative Legal Content

If you are looking to start a blog, a podcast, or a video series, relating to something legal, Patreon could be a great place to get some funding. But as the Boozy Barrister would likely attest to, it's not worth it if you're just looking for a payday: there's got to be a love of content, too.

Also, if you are looking at this is a way to market your practice, or worse, make money marketing your practice, you are off-base. Patreon supporters are looking for entertaining, useful, and valuable content, not sales pitches.

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