Technologist - The FindLaw Legal Technology Blog

5 Common Questions Asked by Tech-Savvy Lawyers

Being one of those tech savvy lawyers can often be overwhelming due to all the questions from the non-tech savvy lawyers. ("What do you mean it wasn't plugged in?" ... "Wait, I can turn my iPhone off?" ... "How do I not reply all?")

But when the tech savvy lawyers have questions, the answers tend to involve a bit more nuance than a Homer Simpson original invention. Below, you'll find five common questions that tech-savvy lawyers have asked.

1. Do We Really Needed Judges That Can Code?

While it is undeniable that knowledge is power, a little bit of it can certainly be a dangerous thing. Whether or not a judge needs to know how to code in order to handle a case about a computer program is up for debate.

2. Can Lawyers Text Message Prospective Clients?

The world of connected mobile devices continues to explode and gain complete market dominance. And as such, lawyers on the forefront of digital legal marketing might want to consider text message advertising in order to keep up with the times, and their clients.

3. Should Lawyers Embrace Legacy Systems?

Technology evolves pretty darn fast. But that doesn't mean the technology of yesterday is no good. In fact, in some instances, using legacy systems can be safer than using the latest greatest next big thing. After all, if the device cannot connect to the internet, can the hackers connect to it?

4. Should Lawyers Bother Reviewing the Raw eDiscovery?

Raw ediscovery can sometimes be incomprehensible and result in your computer crashing under the weight of massive data files. However, sometimes attorneys may need to get their digital hands dirty digging through raw ediscovery before delegating it to a third party professional.

5. How Can Lawyers Survive in an Automated World?

With the increase in automation, particularly in the legal industry, some lawyers may be faced with the very real challenge of competing with a chatbot. But with hard work and the right choices, everything is going to be alright again. Right, Hal?

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