Technologist - The FindLaw Legal Technology Blog

New Legal Tech Group Changing the Legal Landscape

Judith Flournoy, a leader of a new legal tech association, says she thrives in 'a constant state of change.'

As the Association of Legal Technologists holds its inaugural conference this weekend in Arizona, "a constant state of change" seems a fitting attribute for one of its board members. Other members include business and tech leaders who collectively could change the landscape of legal tech.

Actually, that's what they want to do. They are bringing together law firms and tech providers to "think differently" to solve problems in the ever-changing field of legal technology.

"Ctrl ALT Del: Networking Rebooted"

Margarat Hagan, the keynote speaker, is a living example of the "technolution" in the profession. While she was studying at Stanford Law School, she designed a program to help learn the material. It eventually became a law game for Dr. Hagan, who also holds a Ph.D, an MA, and an AB.

Now she directs the legal design lab at Stanford, where she teaches how to design legal products and services. It's about explaining legal concepts visually in a user-friendly way.

"There's a whole universe to be cracked open and explored, especially communication with clients," she told the ABA Journal. "People want timelines, flow charts, and don't want to confront huge amounts of text."

The ALT conference has two tracks. One is focused on "design thinking," strategy and business. The other focuses on technical issues with a hands-on lab.

"Changing the Legal Landscape"

Flournoy said the association wants to "give everyone an equal opportunity to contribute -- and ultimately succeed in an ever-changing and competitive world."

She said the conference will have something for new and seasoned professionals, whether they work in a law firm, law department, or elsewhere in the legal tech industry.

"We are hopeful that by bringing Design Thinking to the fore that we will be able to guide our industry forward using repeatable processes that are well defined thus minimizing disruption," she told Above the Law.

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