eDiscovery & Records Management - Legal Technology - Technologist
Technologist - The FindLaw Legal Technology Blog

Recently in eDiscovery & Records Management Category

Just like you wouldn't let paper files pile up on your desk (you wouldn't, would you?), you shouldn't let your digital files lay around unorganized and untended either. If you're running a paperless office (and most lawyers should have a largely paperless practice by this point), you'll need to put some thought into organizing your digital files.

Here's the trick. The key to managing your digital files is to have a clear organizational system -- and to stick to it. These tips should help make that process easier.

At the annual Relativity Fest in Chicago earlier this month, kCura, the eDiscovery company, brought together four federal judges to discuss eDiscovery, the law, and even a bit of privacy. The panel, hosted by kCura's eDiscovery counsel, David Horrigan, featured some of the names behind eDiscovery's "most impactful rulings," Legaltech News's Ian Lopez reports.

The discussion covered everything from proportionality to the Sedona Principles to Deflategate. Here are some of the highlights.

How can you spot emerging trends in legal technology? You could look at the companies that successful startup accelerators are supporting, like Y Combinator's recent support for a "Turbotax for Immigration." Or you can look at public collaborations, like that between Harvard Law School and the legal research startup Ravel Law. Or look at the tech law firms themselves are using, like the few big firms who've started to employ artificial intelligence.

Or you can look at where the talent is going. Legaltech News's Ricci Dipshan recently did the latter, identifying four legal tech trends as evidenced by recent hires.

A few years ago, your "smoking gun" was likely to show up as a "smoking email," some sort of electronic document, probably found on a single computer, giving essential information in civil litigation, criminal inquiries, or internal investigations. Today, those electronic documents still remain essential, but they've expanded from the smoking email to the smoking text message, or even the smoking Snapchat.

But as information from mobile devices (cell phones, tablets, and the like) has become increasingly important, developments in cloud computing are making accessing that information ever more difficult. Here's why.

Are Your Note-Taking Apps a Security Risk?

Note-taking apps are part of the recent trend of enabling people to document every aspect of their lives for posterity and future use. Everyone knows that with convenience comes diminished security. But what steps do you need to take to ensure your day-to-day musings aren't being hacked?

5 Technology Traps That Can Ruin Your Law Practice

With tech complexity shooting skyward, even pretty well educated folk like lawyers have to watch their steps carefully when it comes to security slip-ups. Any one of the scenarios we list below could completely ruin your practice and your business for a long time -- yet lawyers still do them every day.

Just accept that tech problems will take place. However, you can and should take steps to mitigate how often they take place. A little prep will save much headache down the road.

Digital Footprints That Small Law Firms Should Track

Before the internet age, discovery was a matter of digging through endless paper files. But the problem is that paper can be shredded, torn, burnt. In today's digital world, electronic forensic evidence abounds in every nook and cranny -- sometimes with great overlap.

Small firms must use some creativity to know where to look when dealing in the digital discovery game. These days, it helps to know exactly what digital footprints you should be tracking.

SCOTUS Citation Raises Concerns Over Potential 'Link Rot'

The recent SCOTUS decision of Utah v. Strieff was notable in at least two ways. First it was noteworthy because of Justice Sotomayor's almost Scalia-esque (in terms of passion, if not form) dissent. Some have called it the Court's "Black Lives Matter" moment.

But the Strieff opinion is also noteworthy because it may be the first time in the Court's history in which a URL-link "shortener" was used in place of the real address. Justice Kagan's separate dissent included a citation to http://goo.gl/3Yq3Nd, and that leaves some worried.

Switching to Macs in Your Law Practice: The Basics

According to a recent survey by the Legal Technology Resource Center at the ABA, approximately eight percent of responding lawyers reported that they used a Macintosh in their practice (Macbook, Air, etc.). That doesn't sound like a lot, but it sounds more impressive when you note that the number used to be a little under six percent in 2014 when the same survey was taken.

That means the number is growing, but it's still surprisingly low. Here are a few tips for you to get started switching to Macs in your practice.

Once eDiscovery seemed like a whole separate world from traditional discovery. But now that so much of our work and lives are digital, eDiscovery is quickly becoming the standard mode of discovery in many practice areas. If a former employee claims emotional distress after an injury, check his emails and text messages. If a debtor claims insolvency, look into her social media accounts along with her bank accounts.

But as common as eDiscovery has become, it is hardly a settled field. The eDiscovery world continues to evolve, with new technology, new standards, and new ways to make eDiscovery work better for you. To help you get a handle on all the developments, here are our seven top eDiscovery updates, from the FindLaw archives.