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Is Drone Delivery Really Happening?

A drone will soon be able to deliver a package in 30 minutes across town for $5 to $10.

It gets better, says Matternet CEO Andreas Raptopoulos as his company prepares to launch a drone delivery service. "When you increase the density of your networks, then there is a pathway to get the cost below $2," he said.

It's exciting times, including for law firms that need couriers like Domino's needs drivers, except for one thing: drone delivery companies are taking a little longer to get off the ground in the United States.

Buy or Lease Tech Equipment? Ask Leonardo DiCaprio

Leonard DiCaprio can't afford to buy his party yacht -- fully equipped with three swimming pools, a gym, fitness hall, cinema, and helipad.

DiCaprio, who is reportedly worth about $245 million, rented the $678 million "Topaz" to party with his friends. What's a guy to do when he can't buy everything?

To lease or buy, that is the real question. It's as true for the rich and famous as it is for the law office manager, especially when it comes to tech equipment.

Legal software keeps getting better and better. While the fear of being replaced by an artificially intelligent robot looms more closely for some lawyers than others, for the rest of us, the technological advances just make practicing law even better, and easier.

If you've been thinking about using smart contracts, or some other type of legal AI software or service, you probably have a few questions. Below you'll find five of the top frequently asked questions on smart contracts and legal AI software.

Everyday Tasks for Lawyers Now Obsolete Thanks to Technology

Reflecting on the old days may tell us how old we are but also what we left behind.

In an always evolving technological world, it reminds us that somethings will never be the same. For better or for worse, this is especially true in the practice of law.

For those who remember a time before Kimmel, here's a Letterman-like list of Top 10 Lawyer Things That Are No More:

The Brits Are Coming With LegalTech

Sometimes, it seems like the English have to tell Americans what they've been missing.

Like rock and roll. While Chuck Berry was playing juke joints in the United States, the Beatles were bringing the sound to the Ed Sullivan Show.

Now it's the tech show. London-based firm Allen & Overy has opened up its office space for 60 entrepreneurs to develop technologies for the law firm and other businesses. It's an approach that is going to make some American firms wonder, "Why didn't we think of that?"

How Expensive Is AI for Law Firms Really?

While AI has arrived for work at some law firms, it is still in the future for most.

It's not that law firms are lagging behind in technology. It's just that the high end solutions are too expensive for most lawyers.

Sure, even a solo practitioner can buy a digital assistant for about $200 to manage a calendar and make electronic deposits. But a small firm will spend about $30,000 to install a software robot to handle legal tasks like workflow management and contract review.

And if you need a system to accommodate 500 users, we're talking $250,000 -- to start. After set up, there's the cost of tech personnel and support. It's a half million dollar robot -- not quite Iron Man dollars but more than Robby the Robot.

iPad Pro and Apple Pencil Enable Lawyer to Go Completely Paperless

"A chorus of angels started singing in my head!" attorney Eric Cooperstein said. "Scales fell from my eyes! "

It was not the second coming of the Messiah, but it was a close second for the paperless attorney. Cooperstein, like many lawyers, went paperless in his law practice a decade ago. Drafting and saving pleadings on his computer; scanning letters and other documents; e-filing, e-discovery, and cloud computing: these all became part of the paperless law office.

But there was no paperless solution for Cooperstein's handwritten notes -- until he saw the iPad Pro and the Apple Pencil.

What Should Small Firms Know About AI?

What should solo practitioners and small firms know about AI?

He was only the highest-scoring point guard in the history of the NBA, that's what! He stood toe-to-toe with Michael Jordan, the greatest basketball player of all time, crossed him over and scored on him like a boss!

Wait, you want to know about the other AI? Fine. Work with me here.

Like gifted athletes on the basketball court, solo practitioners and small law firms can own the big leagues on the other court. And AI can get you there. That's what I'm talking about. Artificial Intelligence, not Allen Iverson.

There are some tech devices that all attorneys need. Things like decent computers, quality printers, and effective software are essential for today's practice. Then there's tech that many lawyers should have, like a mostly paperless practice options and good practice management software. But more importantly, there's the tech that attorneys don't need, but want. Really want, because they're cool, helpful, novel, or just entertaining. That's what we're focusing on today.

Here are five nonessential but very worthwhile gadgets you might be interested in, taken from the FindLaw archives.

There are plenty frustrating things about legal writing, like annoying in-text citations, needless jargon, and inflexible word limits. But sometimes just writing is the difficult part. That's because our emails, word processors, and smart phones don't make it easy to use the special characters we need, like section symbols and paragraph signs.

Now there's a keyboard just for lawyers that will end some of that frustration -- and give your mouse and alt key a rest.