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Readers of a particular age -- by which we mean at least 30 -- will remember the days of the mechanical computer keyboard, when depressing the keys made a satisfying "clack" sound. Those sounds are gone because the old mechanical switches have largely been replaced by simple rubber domes that contact the circuit board under the keys.

We wrote about mechanical keyboards last year, but avoided the big question; namely, what kind of keys you want with your keyboard. A German company called Cherry makes, more or less, every switch in modern mechanical keyboards, and they come in several different styles (Blue? Red? Brown? Green?!), each of which has its own pros and cons.

Most of the world is running on laptop computers now, and for good reason. They're the least expensive they've ever been, they're the most portable they've ever been, and for what they are, they're the most powerful they've ever been.

Did we mention portability?

But you'll need a host of accessories to make your laptop useful, and no peripheral is more important to a lawyer than an external monitor (or two). When you're trying to paste from a deposition into a brief, or have five different windows open, that 13-inch laptop screen just isn't going to cut it. Here are three things to take into account when looking at external monitors.

Best Ultrabook Under $1,300

Apple has set the bar high with its new Retina MacBook, a computer that combines the slimness of the MacBook Air with the audacious screen of the Retina MacBook Pro.

The Retina MacBook isn't the only game in town, though, when it comes to the "ultrabook" -- a category of thin, low-power notebooks designed for portability and very long battery life that don't make the sacrifices of netbooks. So what's the best ultrabook for the money?

When the iPad first came out in 2010, I thought, "No one needs one of those," and truthfully, the fact remains that no one needs a tablet, but they're super convenient.

Let's all admit that the iPad is probably the best tablet out there (Apple haters are encouraged to come at me with whatever you've got), but it's awfully pricy, at $500 for the iPad Air 2, the current incarnation of Apple's tablet. Is there a good cheap tablet out there that's not a waste of your time (or money)?

Drones are really having a moment these days, as everyone from backyard hobbyists to CEOs of major corporations have started to integrate drones into everyday life. However, the law surrounding the unmanned, hovering aircraft is still developing.

Think twice, then, before you send a drone out to collect evidence. A federal court in Connecticut ruled that stopping the use of a drone to record the site of a major auto accident does not violate First Amendment rights to free speech and the press.

The Best Printer Under $100

Paperless office? What paperless office? That promise is just as real as flying cars. Lawyers, especially, labor under the burden of ever-more paper, and even though some courts are (finally!) accepting electronically submitted materials, others still refuse.

For your home office, or even for your personal life, a printer is sadly still a requirement. With all the models out there, how can you know what's best? Well, that's where we come in: Here's our guide to the best printer under $100.

Oculus Rift is about as close as we've gotten so far to true virtual reality. It's a head-mounted device that creates an immersive VR experience. A user wearing the headset, for example, can turn his head and the application responds by moving the immersive environment.

Sounds pretty cool -- if it ever comes to fruition (we've been promised the device Real Soon Now for a few years). When immersive VR experiences like Oculus Rift do hit the consumer market, will they have an application in the court room?

Now that we've had the Consumer Electronics Show and Apple's unveiling of the Apple Watch, the question becomes what you can or should buy with your tax refund dollars. Not every piece of technology is worth your time.

Should you spend hundreds on a watch? Or a "learning" thermostat? Or a wireless light bulb? Probably not. Here are three gadgets that are actually worth buying.

When Apple unveiled its ultra-thin, ultra-light, ultra-portable MacBook on Monday, onlookers noticed it was missing something besides a few extra pounds.

Ports. The new MacBook has just one port, called "USB-C," which Apple SVP Phil Schiller claimed was being adopted by more companies than just Apple. The USB-C will handle all your charging and peripheral needs -- at least, those ones that aren't already handled by wireless technology. Allegedly.

It's the middle of the night and you're facing a deadline, or you have a "hot pen," to use Justice Ginsburg's phrasing, when suddenly your screen goes black. You have no idea if your current work has been saved, but worse still -- what about all your other work?

Computer crashes are no fun at all, and if you can't make it to an IT professional to fix the problem, you may want to try these suggestions out before you truly start panicking: