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Are businesses (or their reputation management companies) suing fake defendants in order to get rid of negative online reviews? That's the argument made by Eugene Volokh and Public Citizen's Paul Alan Levy recently in the Volokh Conspiracy.

The duo looked at 25 court cases that followed a suspiciously similar pattern. First, a self-represented company, often with ties to a reputation management firm, sues a defendant for a defamatory online review. Then, the defendants agree to an injunction which quickly results in a court order to take down the allegedly offending content. Suddenly: poof, no more bad review. But when someone tries to find track down those defendants, they're no where to be found. Indeed, they might not even exist.

You're an attorney, not the IT guy, and when it comes to most tech issues, clients usually know to go to (nerdier) experts. But with so many tech problems having legal implications today, you still have to be versed in common tech issues.

To help you out, here are five tech issues almost every lawyer should be ready to discuss with their clients, taken from the FindLaw archives.

The Supreme Court's recent decision in Spokeo v. Robins is already being felt in courts, including in a class action against Lyft over the company's background check procedures. Lyft's drivers alleged that the company broke the law when it conducted background and credit checks without informing them.

But that suit was tossed last Wednesday, largely on the basis of Spokeo. That May, 2016 decision held that plaintiffs must show a concrete injury to gain standing when alleging a violation of their privacy rights.

Sure, a legal career isn't exactly as treacherous as a job as a mountaineer, deep sea diver, or garbage collector -- but that doesn't mean the legal profession isn't without its risks. Attorneys have to constantly worry about protecting client confidences, maintaining the integrity of their information, and making sure that all their I's are crossed and T's are dotted.

Technology has certainly made legal work easier in many ways, but as more and more aspects of a practice are connected, it's also opened plenty of security risks, threats that can bring down your practice and disrupt your life. Here are three all lawyers should be aware of.

When it comes to preventing hackers from spying on you through your webcam, the FBI has a decidedly lo-tech solution: use tape. Speaking at a conference at the Center for Strategic and International Studies on Wednesday, FBI Director James Comey suggested covering up your webcam as one of the "sensible things" the public can do to protect themselves from hackers.

Comey's comments have been met with some derision. (I mean, is tape really the best solution the FBI has for protecting America from hackers?) But it's also good advice. Here's why.

It’s one thing to have your LinkedIn or Dropbox account compromised by hackers. It’s another to have hackers break into your email account, impersonate your typo-filled writing, then convince opposing counsel to send a $63,000 settlement payment to the hacker’s offshore bank account.

Unfortunately, that’s just what happened to one Virginia attorney. The lesson: if you know your email has been compromised, clue in opposing counsel, or you could be responsible for whatever loss follows.

If you're like me (and thousands of other legal professionals), you probably got an email from Dropbox about a week ago, letting you know that you'll need to reset your password. "Huh," you thought, "I didn't even remember that I had a Dropbox account." And then you went about your day.

But that email wasn't just a friendly reminder that Dropbox still existed -- it was one of the first, oblique, acknowledgements of that Dropbox was hacked in 2012, and lost 68 million usernames, emails, and passwords as a result.

If you're tapping away on an iPhone, make sure you've got the latest updates. Otherwise, your calls, text messages, emails, and contacts could all be vulnerable to Israeli cyberspies -- or whoever buys their software.

The NSO Group, an Israeli software company that the New York Times describes as "one of the world's most evasive digital arms dealers," has released software exploiting security vulnerabilities in Apple products, allowing anyone who uses it to collect your information, steal your passwords, track your location, and even secretly record your conversations. All they have to do is send you one text.

New Black Hat Cybersecurity Buzzwords

In the pithy words of Monzy Merza at TechCrunch, the annual Black Hat briefings are an opportunity for the hoi-polloi "to drink from the firehose." While the lions' share of know-how and information will no doubt be devoured and processed by the brainiest of cybersecurity experts and hackers, the rest of us must play the part of vultures -- eating the scraps.

And that assumes we can digest what's left. Blink, and some new threat is already out there on the internet threatening your data and network. Here we'll discuss some of the recurring terms that featured at this year's Black Hat briefing.

Are Your Note-Taking Apps a Security Risk?

Note-taking apps are part of the recent trend of enabling people to document every aspect of their lives for posterity and future use. Everyone knows that with convenience comes diminished security. But what steps do you need to take to ensure your day-to-day musings aren't being hacked?