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There are a lot of cloud storage options out there, for lawyers and laypeople alike. But Microsoft's OneDrive stands out, largely because of its ubiquity. The online file hosting service comes included with Windows 8 and 10 and integrates directly with Microsoft Office applications, like Word and Excel.

But getting the most out of OneDrive takes a bit of finesse. Here are our top suggestions to attorneys and legal professionals who want to make OneDrive work for them.

Zuckerberg's Password Fail: 'Dadada'

Facebook's very own Mark Zuckerberg's suffered the sting of hackers recently when his Twitter and Pinterest accounts were compromised. All fingers seem to be pointing to the 2012 LinkedIn hack that proved to be a major embarrassment for the professional networking site -- and may have revealed Zuckerberg's password.

But it looks like the Facebook CEO could be gaining: his password for multiple accounts was 'dadada'. For shame.

What Oracle v. Google Means for GPUs

What does the recent ruling in Oracle v. Google mean for the future GPL/GNUs? If we're lucky, and if wide Internet opinion is correct, it means more of the status quo -- and that's a good thing if you're an open-source community developer.

For a case that's worth billions of dollars, the jury's special verdict sheet looks awfully innocuous.

The Mobile Lawyer: New on the Scene, Always in Demand

There are a lot of stereotypes that seem to haunt lawyers, including an inability to adapt to the changing times. But a failure to adapt to marketplace changes can be a big business mistake, especially for the solo attorney. As times change, you should be finding that you're spending more time on your mobile device. And that has both good and bad implications.

Last Thursday, the Supreme Court announced changes to the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, which govern criminal prosecutions in federal courts. Those amendments would make it easier to serve summons on foreign organizations without a U.S. presence, reduce the time for responding to electronic service, and allow judges to issue warrants for remote searches of electronically stored information outside of their district.

And it's that last change which will likely have the biggest impact, removing a procedural barrier to government investigations and, critics claim, expanding the government's hacking powers.

Russian Hacker Targets Top Am Law 100 Law Firms

No one is safe from hackers today, at least not in BigLaw. Crain's Chicago Business reports that 48 top Chicago law firms -- many of which are part of the Am Law 100 rankings -- were targeted by a mysterious Russian cybercriminal who operates out of Ukraine. His goal? Top law firms' mergers and acquisitions info. With that sort of inside information, a cybercriminal could do very well for himself.

Another new week, another spate of cyber-criminal activity for firms to prepare against.

If you wanted to transfer real property in England a thousand years ago, you would have to publicly present the buyer with a clod of dirt from the land, symbolizing the transfer of title, and record the exchange in the local shire-book or church-book. One thousand years later and the clod is gone, but the rest of the process is very much the same: transfers of real property are still recorded with the local county's recorder of deeds, the modern equivalent of the shire-book. It's an effective, but not a terribly efficient, system.

Blockchain technology, some propose, can bring that antiquated system into the contemporary age. Blockchain technology could create a widely distributed, indecently verifiable, and largely incorruptible record of property ownership that bypasses the centralized system of county offices and recorders of deeds, or so the thinking goes. It's as though everyone could have their own personal, inscrutable Domesday Book.

FBI Delays Apple Hearing to Try a New iPhone Hack

For the last few weeks, conflict between the iPhone maker and the FBI has been so heated that even people who know nothing about encryption (that's most of us) have developed very spirited and views on the matter.

In a somewhat odd twist, it looks like the FBI just took a breather and said, "Fine, we don't need you," to Apple. It appears that an "outside party" just alerted the government to an alternative means to cracking Syed Farook's phone. This is all very disconcerting, particularly as there was a hearing for the debate to continue on scheduled for today.

Tips for Safeguarding Client Information

Safeguarding client information isn't as easy as you might think. In the digital age, safeguarding information is something even the most tech-savvy corporations struggle with. To ensure that your clients' information is safe, you actually have to be proactive about your security. Let's start from the beginning.

The cloud isn't just going to transform how attorneys work and compute, it already has. From endless email storage to cloud-based eDiscovery, lawyers are working on the cloud every single day.

So, what is the cloud anyway? (Besides just "someone else's computer.") And what do lawyers need to know about it? Here are FindLaw's top seven cloud-based blog posts to help keep you up to date.