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New Data Company Releases Analytics on International Commercial Arbitration

A new database has been published with more than 66,000 data fields on thousands of commercial arbitration cases in 136 countries, enabling legal professionals to analyze international arbitration in new ways.

No, it's not from Wikileaks or Edward Snowden. It's from a start-up company called Dispute Resolution Data, which has contracts to collect and release the information from some 20 arbitration institutions.

This is a significant release of information because, historically, commercial arbitration has been confidential. Commercial arbitrators have closely guarded case information to maintain participant privacy. Dispute Resolution Data takes that information and creates research analytics.

5 Tech Mistakes Lawyers Make

All mistakes are not created equal. For lawyers, one faux pas may cause trouble with a co-worker. A different misstep may upset a client. And you don't want to think about stepping on a judge's toes.

But in the cyberworld, mistakes can reach global proportions with the speed of a mouse-click. The essence of any error may be the same, but the potential is magnified by the medium.

Here are five tech errors that are so common, you probably have made a few of them:

How Tech Is Making Pro Bono Work Easier for Lawyers

Getting a lawyer to do pro bono work these days is easier than getting a lawyer to a car crash scene. Seriously, that's not a lawyer joke (but I will be here all week).

A generation ago, lawyers were called "ambulance chasers" because many people thought they were more interested in making money from their clients' misfortunes than the clients themselves. But today, partly due to the generosity of many lawyers to take on clients for free, more people know the term "pro bono" than ever. And tech is only making things easier.

Time Is Running Out on Excuses Not to Go Paperless

Give me one good reason not to go paperless.

Having trouble? That's because you are in a paperless world. You are reading this very article on a digital screen. It's the future.

Maybe 20 years ago, when only a handful of law firms and courts had gone paperless, it would have been excusable. But today, basically every court requires electronic filings and even the trash can is an icon on your computer.

"In sum, some courts have been paperless for nearly two decades and the rest are in the process," says Sam Glover for the Lawyerist. "Malpractice insurers are paperless and recommend it."

Benefits of Legal Tech Outsourcing

In an age when technology is making some careers obsolete, lawyers can thank the outsourcing of digital services for helping them compete.

According to a recent survey, lawyers are using more outside services to handle digital tasks at their firms. Swiss Post Solutions (SPS) North America, a leader in outsourcing and digitization solutions, says law firms outsourced mailroom and messenger services the most (93 percent), reception services next (50 percent), and then conference room management (47 percent). Big law firms have led the way, but smaller firms are catching up.

If you're like me (and thousands of other legal professionals), you probably got an email from Dropbox about a week ago, letting you know that you'll need to reset your password. "Huh," you thought, "I didn't even remember that I had a Dropbox account." And then you went about your day.

But that email wasn't just a friendly reminder that Dropbox still existed -- it was one of the first, oblique, acknowledgements of that Dropbox was hacked in 2012, and lost 68 million usernames, emails, and passwords as a result.

Wearable Tech Is a Security Nightmare

As time goes on, technology has not only assumed a larger role in the layman's life, but in the lawyer's as well. Today, wearable tech is all the rage -- and whenever something is all the rage, that's when professionals should let cooler heads take the lead. Because any sane-minded professional should realize that wearable tech presents an enormous security risk.

Cloud Tech and IT Is Evolving Fast, to Small Firms' Benefit

Most attorneys don't practice in a massive firm, but go it alone or work with a few partners. That's about 84 percent of us. That's right, four out of five lawyers (plus change) are having to handle a significant amount of our own law firm functioning.

But fear not, it looks like the demands of the market have created a solution that might give some smaller players in the game some hope. Legal tech is starting to take small firms seriously, to the small practitioner's benefit.

There are a lot of cloud storage options out there, for lawyers and laypeople alike. But Microsoft's OneDrive stands out, largely because of its ubiquity. The online file hosting service comes included with Windows 8 and 10 and integrates directly with Microsoft Office applications, like Word and Excel.

But getting the most out of OneDrive takes a bit of finesse. Here are our top suggestions to attorneys and legal professionals who want to make OneDrive work for them.

Zuckerberg's Password Fail: 'Dadada'

Facebook's very own Mark Zuckerberg's suffered the sting of hackers recently when his Twitter and Pinterest accounts were compromised. All fingers seem to be pointing to the 2012 LinkedIn hack that proved to be a major embarrassment for the professional networking site -- and may have revealed Zuckerberg's password.

But it looks like the Facebook CEO could be gaining: his password for multiple accounts was 'dadada'. For shame.