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Espionage Charges Leveled at Former NSA Contractor for Stealing Hacking Tools

Harold T. Martin III has been facing up to 10 years in prison for allegedly stealing classified government information, but he may soon face another 30 years as prosecutors plan to file espionage charges against him.

In any case, the former contractor for the National Security Agency is not going anywhere for a long time. Unlike Eric Snowden who fled the country after he leaked classified information, Martin is in jail.

Dispel Cybersecurity Myths at the Law Firm

In Greek mythology, Phobos was the bloody god of fear in war. Worshipers built him a temple of skulls. His name brought panic and flight.

Thousands of years later, Phobos spawned the word "phobias." It means an irrational fear of something or someone. Today, fears of being hacked and encountering cyber-terrorism have created their own myths.

The cybersecurity threats are real, but not all fears were created equal. Here are a few myths:

Top 3 Tips to Keep Legal Documents Secure

Not so long ago, cybersecurity was not even a word in the dictionary. Type the word into a Google search now and you will see more than 25 million results in less than a second.

Punctuated by the occasional 1.5 billion email hacks at Yahoo or other internet service provider, cybersecurity is probably the main concern in information technology today. It is the word in IT.

For attorneys, whose profession is built on tenets such as attorney-client confidentiality, cybersecurity is more important than ever. Client files, financial information, and endless stores of digital documents must be safeguarded.

Here are some top tips to keep your legal documents secure:

New Data Company Releases Analytics on International Commercial Arbitration

A new database has been published with more than 66,000 data fields on thousands of commercial arbitration cases in 136 countries, enabling legal professionals to analyze international arbitration in new ways.

No, it's not from Wikileaks or Edward Snowden. It's from a start-up company called Dispute Resolution Data, which has contracts to collect and release the information from some 20 arbitration institutions.

This is a significant release of information because, historically, commercial arbitration has been confidential. Commercial arbitrators have closely guarded case information to maintain participant privacy. Dispute Resolution Data takes that information and creates research analytics.

5 Tech Mistakes Lawyers Make

All mistakes are not created equal. For lawyers, one faux pas may cause trouble with a co-worker. A different misstep may upset a client. And you don't want to think about stepping on a judge's toes.

But in the cyberworld, mistakes can reach global proportions with the speed of a mouse-click. The essence of any error may be the same, but the potential is magnified by the medium.

Here are five tech errors that are so common, you probably have made a few of them:

How Tech Is Making Pro Bono Work Easier for Lawyers

Getting a lawyer to do pro bono work these days is easier than getting a lawyer to a car crash scene. Seriously, that's not a lawyer joke (but I will be here all week).

A generation ago, lawyers were called "ambulance chasers" because many people thought they were more interested in making money from their clients' misfortunes than the clients themselves. But today, partly due to the generosity of many lawyers to take on clients for free, more people know the term "pro bono" than ever. And tech is only making things easier.

Time Is Running Out on Excuses Not to Go Paperless

Give me one good reason not to go paperless.

Having trouble? That's because you are in a paperless world. You are reading this very article on a digital screen. It's the future.

Maybe 20 years ago, when only a handful of law firms and courts had gone paperless, it would have been excusable. But today, basically every court requires electronic filings and even the trash can is an icon on your computer.

"In sum, some courts have been paperless for nearly two decades and the rest are in the process," says Sam Glover for the Lawyerist. "Malpractice insurers are paperless and recommend it."

Benefits of Legal Tech Outsourcing

In an age when technology is making some careers obsolete, lawyers can thank the outsourcing of digital services for helping them compete.

According to a recent survey, lawyers are using more outside services to handle digital tasks at their firms. Swiss Post Solutions (SPS) North America, a leader in outsourcing and digitization solutions, says law firms outsourced mailroom and messenger services the most (93 percent), reception services next (50 percent), and then conference room management (47 percent). Big law firms have led the way, but smaller firms are catching up.

If you're like me (and thousands of other legal professionals), you probably got an email from Dropbox about a week ago, letting you know that you'll need to reset your password. "Huh," you thought, "I didn't even remember that I had a Dropbox account." And then you went about your day.

But that email wasn't just a friendly reminder that Dropbox still existed -- it was one of the first, oblique, acknowledgements of that Dropbox was hacked in 2012, and lost 68 million usernames, emails, and passwords as a result.

Wearable Tech Is a Security Nightmare

As time goes on, technology has not only assumed a larger role in the layman's life, but in the lawyer's as well. Today, wearable tech is all the rage -- and whenever something is all the rage, that's when professionals should let cooler heads take the lead. Because any sane-minded professional should realize that wearable tech presents an enormous security risk.