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When I was in law school, course materials repeatedly referred to "Google or Bing," as in, don't use them for legal research. It was a combo that was, literally, laughable. Bing? Almost no one used Bing back then.

And that's a problem, according to the European Union. With Google having a virtual lock down on the Internet search market -- it controls around 65 percent of U.S. searches, but over 90 percent of searches in Europe -- it has enormous power to control where Internet users end up. And it's been abusing that power to promote its own services, according to an antitrust complaint filed by the EU.

The Department of Homeland Security could possibly have to reveal details of its secretive Standing Operating Procedure 303 program should the D.C. Circuit rehear a recent decision en banc. SOP 303 is the voluntary process for cutting off the nation's cellular phone system in times of emergency.

The program, adopted after cell phones were used in a 2005 London bombing, is highly controversial. Cutting off mobile communication is something more often associated with authoritarian regimes looking to maintain a tenuous grasp on power. The Egyptian government under Hosni Mubarak shut off cell service during the Arab Spring protests, for example. Iran, Mynamar, and China have all taken steps to stop mobile communication at some point.

So, will a rehearing mean that we'll find out what would cause the U.S. to do the same?

Medical malpractice? Divorce? Mergers and acquisitions? There's an app for that! Or there could be -- and it could be yours.

As mobile technology continues to proliferate, many law firms have thrown their hat into the ring in the form of a mobile app. According to a report by Law Firm Mobile, 36 AmLaw 200 firms have produced 53 different mobile apps, and the numbers continue to rise. Is BigLaw smart to go after the mobile user? Should you join them?

When we last left Stingrays in January, the FBI insisted that they didn't need a warrant to use them. The devices, which fool a cell phone into connecting with them as though they were a legitimate cell tower, are deployed from public spaces, where there's no reasonable expectation of privacy, the FBI claimed.

Everyone got a good chuckle out of that one, but the degree to which the FBI will go to keep Stingrays secret is no laughing matter, as we learned from new documents released by the New York Civil Liberties Union.

For the past few months, the government has been waging a PR campaign against enhanced phone encryption -- encryption of the type that might make it harder for government snoops to peak into your phones. When Apple announced that it wouldn't be able to break the default encryption in their new operating system, FBI Director James Comey went as far to say that children will die as a result.

Several commentators noted the irony behind Comey's histrionics. The FBI itself recommended that consumers encrypt their phones. Well, not anymore.

Earlier today, Apple held its much-anticipated March 2015 event in San Francisco. On the docket, as rumored, were product updates, the introduction of the fabled Apple Watch, and a surprise for those of us who have been pirating "Game of Thrones" all these years.

So, what happened?

At the end of January, Apple CEO Tim Cook announced that the Apple Watch, the vaunted smart timepiece introduced in September, would start shipping in April. The lowest-end version of the watch is the Apple Watch Sport, which rumors believe will start at about $350. The high-end 18K gold version, called Apple Watch Edition, might fetch $3,000.

Fancy lawyers will (and do) pay well over $350 for a fancy watch, but is the Apple Watch worth it? Critics have predicted the watch will be a flop, much like the Samsung Galaxy Gear. The Apple Watch, though, packs enough features into its 38 mm body that lawyers who have to have The Next Big Thing might actually find it useful.

Hey, everyone! Above the Law is sponsoring an e-discovery quiz! You can enter your email address at the end to be entered to win a Fitbit.

Which got us wondering: It's kind of odd (or maybe it's by design) that a Fitbit is the prize for an e-discovery quiz. The e-discovery revolution begun in the late '90s continues unabated, but wearable data-collecting devices like the Fitbit present a new and interesting problem for electronic discovery.

This Is How I Got a Free Vanity Phone Line for My Law Firm

Phone numbers are hard to memorize. True story: At one point, I didn't even know my own cellphone number. Everyone used my Google Voice number, which forwarded to the prepaid cell phone that I carried at school. So when I decided to open my practice, I wanted a phone number that was a little bit easier to memorize.

And my old GV number, part of which spelled out the word "CHUNKY," wasn't going to cut it for a law firm.

I also wanted a landline around the office for support staff and for the once or twice per year that somebody decides that it's time for me to dust off my fax machine. The solution? A $30 adapter and Google Voice.

Boy, the FBI just has an answer for everything, doesn't it? If the FISA court doesn't grant your top-secret warrant for wiretapping (which is unusual because it almost always grants warrants), you just shrug your shoulders and issue a National Security Letter instead.

And if some people insist that your cellphone-deceiving surveillance technology is illegal, you just say you don't need a warrant. Problem solved!