Mobile Phones / Smartphones - Legal Technology - Technologist
Technologist - The FindLaw Legal Technology Blog

Recently in Mobile Phones / Smartphones Category

Earlier today, Apple held its much-anticipated March 2015 event in San Francisco. On the docket, as rumored, were product updates, the introduction of the fabled Apple Watch, and a surprise for those of us who have been pirating "Game of Thrones" all these years.

So, what happened?

At the end of January, Apple CEO Tim Cook announced that the Apple Watch, the vaunted smart timepiece introduced in September, would start shipping in April. The lowest-end version of the watch is the Apple Watch Sport, which rumors believe will start at about $350. The high-end 18K gold version, called Apple Watch Edition, might fetch $3,000.

Fancy lawyers will (and do) pay well over $350 for a fancy watch, but is the Apple Watch worth it? Critics have predicted the watch will be a flop, much like the Samsung Galaxy Gear. The Apple Watch, though, packs enough features into its 38 mm body that lawyers who have to have The Next Big Thing might actually find it useful.

Hey, everyone! Above the Law is sponsoring an e-discovery quiz! You can enter your email address at the end to be entered to win a Fitbit.

Which got us wondering: It's kind of odd (or maybe it's by design) that a Fitbit is the prize for an e-discovery quiz. The e-discovery revolution begun in the late '90s continues unabated, but wearable data-collecting devices like the Fitbit present a new and interesting problem for electronic discovery.

This Is How I Got a Free Vanity Phone Line for My Law Firm

Phone numbers are hard to memorize. True story: At one point, I didn't even know my own cellphone number. Everyone used my Google Voice number, which forwarded to the prepaid cell phone that I carried at school. So when I decided to open my practice, I wanted a phone number that was a little bit easier to memorize.

And my old GV number, part of which spelled out the word "CHUNKY," wasn't going to cut it for a law firm.

I also wanted a landline around the office for support staff and for the once or twice per year that somebody decides that it's time for me to dust off my fax machine. The solution? A $30 adapter and Google Voice.

Boy, the FBI just has an answer for everything, doesn't it? If the FISA court doesn't grant your top-secret warrant for wiretapping (which is unusual because it almost always grants warrants), you just shrug your shoulders and issue a National Security Letter instead.

And if some people insist that your cellphone-deceiving surveillance technology is illegal, you just say you don't need a warrant. Problem solved!

FindLaw's 10 Most Popular Gadget Posts of 2014

It's no secret that FindLaw's Technologist is my favorite of our Legal Professional blogs. Tech + Law = Geek happiness. But this is a surprisingly broad blog: national security, cybercrime, online legal marketing, software, hardware, and gadgets are all fair game.

And out of all that, the gadget review posts are my favorite. Why? It's my chance to play with a new toy and to tell you how that toy might be somewhat, arguably, useful to your practice. (At least if the tax man is asking -- gotta love deductions.)

Anyway, I love gadgets and apparently y'all do too, as our gadget review posts were among our most popular, traffic-wise. Here were our Top 10 legal tech reviews for 2014:

BlackBerry Classic Has Arrived; We've Got Deja Vu x2

You miss that QWERTY keyboard, don't you? You're not alone. Many of us do, which is why BlackBerry keeps releasing new keyboard-equipped models, including two entrants this quarter alone -- the Passport and the Classic. We've talked about the Passport -- behemoth phablet meets QWERTY taskmaster at a premium price -- but today, BlackBerry made the Classic model official.

What's the Classic? Depending on whom you ask, it's either (a) a long-overdue pragmatic fit of nostalgia or (b) the same phone BlackBerry has released three times in the past few years.

Yesterday, a federal jury found that Apple's iTunes 7 updates, made between 2006 and 2009, weren't anticompetitive . The verdict caps 10 years of litigation alleging Apple locked other music providers out of its iPods.

There's been quite a bit of misreporting what's actually going on in this case, so we decided to clarify some of the facts and issues at play.

Earlier this week, Owen Williams of The Next Web found his Apple iCloud account locked. Williams was smart and enabled two-factor authentication on his account after reading the sad story of Wired's Mat Honan, whose Apple and Google accounts were hacked through a social engineering trick in which the attackers got his password reset over the phone.

Williams, unfortunately, couldn't access his iCloud account because he'd forgotten the recovery code. Does this mean we should all dismiss two-factor authentication?

What happens when everyone suddenly has a smartphone and a wireless network? Appliance companies start making the same old things they used to -- but with wireless capability and smartphone access.

Seems preposterous? It can be. From the "smart" washing machine to the "smart" yoga mat, companies are coming up with new and interesting ways to make you pay $200 more for the same old crap you always had -- but now you can control it with your iPad!

Here are five of the dumbest-sounding "smart" devices we've come across: