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Yesterday, a federal jury found that Apple's iTunes 7 updates, made between 2006 and 2009, weren't anticompetitive . The verdict caps 10 years of litigation alleging Apple locked other music providers out of its iPods.

There's been quite a bit of misreporting what's actually going on in this case, so we decided to clarify some of the facts and issues at play.

Earlier this week, Owen Williams of The Next Web found his Apple iCloud account locked. Williams was smart and enabled two-factor authentication on his account after reading the sad story of Wired's Mat Honan, whose Apple and Google accounts were hacked through a social engineering trick in which the attackers got his password reset over the phone.

Williams, unfortunately, couldn't access his iCloud account because he'd forgotten the recovery code. Does this mean we should all dismiss two-factor authentication?

What happens when everyone suddenly has a smartphone and a wireless network? Appliance companies start making the same old things they used to -- but with wireless capability and smartphone access.

Seems preposterous? It can be. From the "smart" washing machine to the "smart" yoga mat, companies are coming up with new and interesting ways to make you pay $200 more for the same old crap you always had -- but now you can control it with your iPad!

Here are five of the dumbest-sounding "smart" devices we've come across:

Man, this is a beautiful update.

Android L/Lollipop (5.0) represents the biggest overhaul of the operating system since the jump from Gingerbread (2.x) to Ice Cream Sandwich (4.0).  We talked about the visual overhaul after previews of the new "Material Design" interface leaked, and were especially intrigued by rumors of Project Volta: the effort to make my phone last longer than 20 minutes on a battery.

Lollipop is here. And as promised, here are our first impressions:

Apple has long-since had an issue with its messaging service not playing nicely with Androids and other smartphones. I noticed the issue when I ditched my badly aging iPhone 3GS for a Google Nexus 4 a few years ago -- texts would be lost in the vapors, especially group text messages.

It turns out I wasn't alone: iMessage, which routes text messages though Apple's service, was intercepting text messages from fellow Apple users, even after users switched to Android. For a while, the problem went unaddressed. Then Apple was sued by an aggravated Galaxy S5 owner.

Now? Apple released a tool to fix the problem late last week. And U.S. District Court Judge Lucy Koh ruled Monday that the lawsuit could move forward.

What happens when you wait years to release an office suite for mobile, then put it behind the Office 365 paywall?

Our best guess: Nobody was using it. That very well might change now that Microsoft has just made Office for iOS (both iPhone and iPad) free to use, with only a handful of advanced features blocked by the paywall.

And, if like me, you aren't carrying an iPhone or iPad, there's still hope: Both Android and touch-friendly Windows tablets will soon have their own versions of Microsoft's industry standard suite.

We don't give BlackBerry nearly as much attention as the other guys, in large part because almost nobody uses a BlackBerry anymore. Nonetheless, the company's CEO John Chen reassured the world that they are "still in the phone business."

OK, but what exactly does that mean? How about a new flagship phone: the Passport, which we've mentioned before. And the modern take on a throw-back design, the Classic, which is set for release next month. And, like everybody else, an update to their operating system.

Yep, they're still around. And if you love your QWERTY keyboard phones, keep reading:

I have to admit: The idea of fingerprint unlocking is pretty damn appealing. Passcodes? Too much work. Like, four digits worth of work. And those little swipey gesture things you can do on Android? They work, I suppose, but it's so hard to get those correct without looking when driving.

Plus, you can't crack a fingerprint. You can crack a passcode.

However, a judge in Virginia just complicated the equation a bit with a simple reminder of legal precedent: A fingerprint isn't constitutionally protected, but a passcode is. This means that police need a warrant to search your phone (thanks, SCOTUS) but even if they get one, they may not be able to get past the lock screen.

I like Google Now. Sure, it's a bit creepy that it does its voodoo magic (telling me my flight information, giving me sports scores, notifying me of updates on my favorite blogs, etc.) by scanning my email and tracking my online activities, but it sure is handy. In fact, Google Now is one of the big reasons why I still have an Android phone.

And Gmail? It revolutionized free email. And the one thing I miss since switching to Outlook as my daily provider is the handy Primary/Social/Promotional dividers in my inbox, which shove all of those annoying "You'll love our newest look!" and "Jimmy Johns wants to connect with you!" emails into their own special boxes.

But Google Inbox, the new task-oriented take on Gmail? It's like the two products made sweet, sweet love and this is their glorious, magnificent lovechild.

That "unlimited" data plan your cell phone provider offers is probably anything but, and the FTC isn't happy about it -- so unhappy that it's filed a complaint in federal court.

See, back in 2007, when AT&T was the only carrier offering the iPhone, it enticed customers with promises of "unlimited" data. Because, really, how much data could people possibly use?

Turns out it was a lot. Previous "smart" phones had Internet capability, but those Web browsers were simple training-wheels browsers, and there was no other reason to use cell data other than for email. The iPhone, with its functional browser and applications, changed all that -- and then streaming video changed all that some more.