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That "unlimited" data plan your cell phone provider offers is probably anything but, and the FTC isn't happy about it -- so unhappy that it's filed a complaint in federal court.

See, back in 2007, when AT&T was the only carrier offering the iPhone, it enticed customers with promises of "unlimited" data. Because, really, how much data could people possibly use?

Turns out it was a lot. Previous "smart" phones had Internet capability, but those Web browsers were simple training-wheels browsers, and there was no other reason to use cell data other than for email. The iPhone, with its functional browser and applications, changed all that -- and then streaming video changed all that some more.

I have one question for Apple after yesterday's presentation: How in the heck did you forget to mention Apple SIM?

The revolutionary new SIM card -- which was first pointed out by 9to5 Mac, was not mentioned in Apple's keynote, and which only began to make waves on the tech blogs later in the afternoon -- could revolutionize how you connect your tablet to cellular data.

How? It allows you to hop data networks when you don't have coverage, or when one carrier is offering a cheaper price, or when you travel to the UK. It is, in essence, a cross-carrier SIM card that supports AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile in the United States and EE in the United Kingdom, with hopefully more networks to come.

Every year, like clockwork, Google updates Android with a new version. And every year, without fail, it introduced a new Nexus phone, along with a few other assorted Nexus-branded devices.

Why should you care? Because when it comes to the pure Android experience, Nexus devices are the way to go. They're the first devices to get updates, since they come straight from Google. And, in the past, the devices were far cheaper than their more mainstream counterparts from Samsung and Apple.

How did this year's line stack up? Mildly disappointing, at least in terms of new hardware. But for existing Android owners, the upcoming operating system update (Lollipop) represents a huge leap forward in terms of speed and battery life.

Last year, when Shake debuted, I quipped that we (lawyers) just got replaced by a contract-drafting app. Fortunately, our execution was stayed for a bit -- it took over a year for the app to make the leap from iOS (iPhone and iPad) to the wider world of desktops and Android devices.

Alas, the day of reckoning is at hand: The Android app dropped yesterday. Is it time to burn my bar card and Juris Doctorate? No, not in the least, and not just because there will always be criminals to defend and apps really don't do that (yet).

Shake is a good first step, an app with potential that could come in handy (right now) for a few folks, but it's nowhere near catching up to the dozens of online DIY legal form providers -- yet.

You have a small firm. You want to be "connected" at all times. If an important client calls, you want to be able to answer that call, whether you are in the office, on the road, or making s'mores in the mountains (assuming you have cell service up there).

This is what Google Voice used to be good at: forwarding incoming calls from your Google Voice phone number to anywhere (landline, cell, computer). But, the app hadn't been updated in years for either iOS or Android. Plus, it was pretty much for incoming calls only -- dial out on your phone and you've just given that client your cell number. (There was a workaround for Android that spoofed your Google Voice number, but thanks to the core app's stagnation, it was a pain to use.)

Well, Google just fixed everything. Kinda. Google Voice is now (mostly) integrated in its Hangouts app, which means a free business phone number, free VoIP services to the U.S. and Canada, free texting, and only a slight headache, though we'll try to simplify it a bit.

Unless you've been in the mountains of Tora Bora all week, you've probably heard that Apple is releasing a new iPhone. By now, the phone has already been made available for pre-order. This one will be shinier, faster (and strangely, larger in size). "Well," you say, "I don't need a new phone. Mine is working just fine."

Is it? Are you sure? Even if you're not interested in upgrading right now, there are some other things you might want to take into account before you count yourself out.

Yesterday, Apple revealed its long-awaited, and much-leaked iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. Were there any real suprises? No. But the two phones, at 4.7 inches and 5.5 inches, are way bigger and wider than Apple's previous models.

But, phablet or no phablet, maybe you're not an Apple person. Though these Android and BlackBerry phones didn't get quite the obsessive spectacle that Apple's events do, at least on paper, they stand up to (and maybe trump) Cupertino's latest offerings.

Here are five alternatives, set for release this quarter:

No surprises here, though there is a whole lot of new Apple crack for all you fanatics out there.

Today, the company announced its long-awaited and much-rumored iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, as well as the Apple Watch. With the two new phone models, Apple's smartphone lineup expands to four options -- 5c, 5s, 6, 6 Plus -- and with the Apple Watch, the company will get in on the growing wearables category, challenging notable Android Wear entries from Motorola, Samsung, and LG.

I must admit: I initially didn't understand the tablet craze. When Apple announced the iPad, I was like, "Uh, it's like a half-functional computer. And I have a smartphone. Why?" Eventually, I got an iPad 2 as a gift and it was like crack during bar review -- I never put the damn thing down. And then the novelty wore off, I sold it, and then got a smaller Android tablet, one which quickly began to collect dust.

It's not just me either. Tablet sales are slowing now that the market is saturated. Consumers are starting to ask, "Do I really need to upgrade?" Or better yet, "Do I really need one?" After all, the trend in smartphones, even at Apple, is bigger "phablet" screens.

The answer to both of those questions, dear law students, is "no." Here's why:

The "Stingray" is a neat little device that fools a cell phone into connecting to it as though it were a cellular phone tower. Once connected, the Stingray can record the device's unique ID, monitor the device's traffic, and even triangulate the cell phone's position.

It's also questionably legal. In June, unsealed documents revealed that Florida police were caught lying about using information from a Stingray to obtain warrants. As Ars Technica reports, officers were instructed to "refer to the assistance as 'received information from a confidential source regarding the location of the suspect.'" They were also told never to refer to the Stingray in police documents and to re-submit warrant affidavits that referred to them, according to the ACLU.

Lies notwithstanding, we still don't know any more about Stingrays, and now the FCC wants to get involved.