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Man, this is a beautiful update.

Android L/Lollipop (5.0) represents the biggest overhaul of the operating system since the jump from Gingerbread (2.x) to Ice Cream Sandwich (4.0).  We talked about the visual overhaul after previews of the new "Material Design" interface leaked, and were especially intrigued by rumors of Project Volta: the effort to make my phone last longer than 20 minutes on a battery.

Lollipop is here. And as promised, here are our first impressions:

Apple has long-since had an issue with its messaging service not playing nicely with Androids and other smartphones. I noticed the issue when I ditched my badly aging iPhone 3GS for a Google Nexus 4 a few years ago -- texts would be lost in the vapors, especially group text messages.

It turns out I wasn't alone: iMessage, which routes text messages though Apple's service, was intercepting text messages from fellow Apple users, even after users switched to Android. For a while, the problem went unaddressed. Then Apple was sued by an aggravated Galaxy S5 owner.

Now? Apple released a tool to fix the problem late last week. And U.S. District Court Judge Lucy Koh ruled Monday that the lawsuit could move forward.

What happens when you wait years to release an office suite for mobile, then put it behind the Office 365 paywall?

Our best guess: Nobody was using it. That very well might change now that Microsoft has just made Office for iOS (both iPhone and iPad) free to use, with only a handful of advanced features blocked by the paywall.

And, if like me, you aren't carrying an iPhone or iPad, there's still hope: Both Android and touch-friendly Windows tablets will soon have their own versions of Microsoft's industry standard suite.

We don't give BlackBerry nearly as much attention as the other guys, in large part because almost nobody uses a BlackBerry anymore. Nonetheless, the company's CEO John Chen reassured the world that they are "still in the phone business."

OK, but what exactly does that mean? How about a new flagship phone: the Passport, which we've mentioned before. And the modern take on a throw-back design, the Classic, which is set for release next month. And, like everybody else, an update to their operating system.

Yep, they're still around. And if you love your QWERTY keyboard phones, keep reading:

I have to admit: The idea of fingerprint unlocking is pretty damn appealing. Passcodes? Too much work. Like, four digits worth of work. And those little swipey gesture things you can do on Android? They work, I suppose, but it's so hard to get those correct without looking when driving.

Plus, you can't crack a fingerprint. You can crack a passcode.

However, a judge in Virginia just complicated the equation a bit with a simple reminder of legal precedent: A fingerprint isn't constitutionally protected, but a passcode is. This means that police need a warrant to search your phone (thanks, SCOTUS) but even if they get one, they may not be able to get past the lock screen.

I like Google Now. Sure, it's a bit creepy that it does its voodoo magic (telling me my flight information, giving me sports scores, notifying me of updates on my favorite blogs, etc.) by scanning my email and tracking my online activities, but it sure is handy. In fact, Google Now is one of the big reasons why I still have an Android phone.

And Gmail? It revolutionized free email. And the one thing I miss since switching to Outlook as my daily provider is the handy Primary/Social/Promotional dividers in my inbox, which shove all of those annoying "You'll love our newest look!" and "Jimmy Johns wants to connect with you!" emails into their own special boxes.

But Google Inbox, the new task-oriented take on Gmail? It's like the two products made sweet, sweet love and this is their glorious, magnificent lovechild.

That "unlimited" data plan your cell phone provider offers is probably anything but, and the FTC isn't happy about it -- so unhappy that it's filed a complaint in federal court.

See, back in 2007, when AT&T was the only carrier offering the iPhone, it enticed customers with promises of "unlimited" data. Because, really, how much data could people possibly use?

Turns out it was a lot. Previous "smart" phones had Internet capability, but those Web browsers were simple training-wheels browsers, and there was no other reason to use cell data other than for email. The iPhone, with its functional browser and applications, changed all that -- and then streaming video changed all that some more.

I have one question for Apple after yesterday's presentation: How in the heck did you forget to mention Apple SIM?

The revolutionary new SIM card -- which was first pointed out by 9to5 Mac, was not mentioned in Apple's keynote, and which only began to make waves on the tech blogs later in the afternoon -- could revolutionize how you connect your tablet to cellular data.

How? It allows you to hop data networks when you don't have coverage, or when one carrier is offering a cheaper price, or when you travel to the UK. It is, in essence, a cross-carrier SIM card that supports AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile in the United States and EE in the United Kingdom, with hopefully more networks to come.

Every year, like clockwork, Google updates Android with a new version. And every year, without fail, it introduced a new Nexus phone, along with a few other assorted Nexus-branded devices.

Why should you care? Because when it comes to the pure Android experience, Nexus devices are the way to go. They're the first devices to get updates, since they come straight from Google. And, in the past, the devices were far cheaper than their more mainstream counterparts from Samsung and Apple.

How did this year's line stack up? Mildly disappointing, at least in terms of new hardware. But for existing Android owners, the upcoming operating system update (Lollipop) represents a huge leap forward in terms of speed and battery life.

Last year, when Shake debuted, I quipped that we (lawyers) just got replaced by a contract-drafting app. Fortunately, our execution was stayed for a bit -- it took over a year for the app to make the leap from iOS (iPhone and iPad) to the wider world of desktops and Android devices.

Alas, the day of reckoning is at hand: The Android app dropped yesterday. Is it time to burn my bar card and Juris Doctorate? No, not in the least, and not just because there will always be criminals to defend and apps really don't do that (yet).

Shake is a good first step, an app with potential that could come in handy (right now) for a few folks, but it's nowhere near catching up to the dozens of online DIY legal form providers -- yet.