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That annoying comment might be more than spam telling visitors how to solve their intimacy issues, or how to make easy money at home. Instead, it may be malicious code that could hijack your site, lock you out completely, and even take over your server as a whole -- a nightmare for larger companies that store more than a simple webpage on their servers.

Fortunately, the bug, discovered by Finnish IT security company Klikki Oy, was reported to WordPress months before being made public, and security patches are already being automatically (no pun intended) deployed. The bug affects an estimated 86 percent of WordPress sites (those running any unpatched version of WordPress 3 -- version 4.0, which was released in September, are not affected). The exploit uses text input fields, such as the enabled-by-default blog comments feature, to deploy malicious code.

What happens when you wait years to release an office suite for mobile, then put it behind the Office 365 paywall?

Our best guess: Nobody was using it. That very well might change now that Microsoft has just made Office for iOS (both iPhone and iPad) free to use, with only a handful of advanced features blocked by the paywall.

And, if like me, you aren't carrying an iPhone or iPad, there's still hope: Both Android and touch-friendly Windows tablets will soon have their own versions of Microsoft's industry standard suite.

I like Google Now. Sure, it's a bit creepy that it does its voodoo magic (telling me my flight information, giving me sports scores, notifying me of updates on my favorite blogs, etc.) by scanning my email and tracking my online activities, but it sure is handy. In fact, Google Now is one of the big reasons why I still have an Android phone.

And Gmail? It revolutionized free email. And the one thing I miss since switching to Outlook as my daily provider is the handy Primary/Social/Promotional dividers in my inbox, which shove all of those annoying "You'll love our newest look!" and "Jimmy Johns wants to connect with you!" emails into their own special boxes.

But Google Inbox, the new task-oriented take on Gmail? It's like the two products made sweet, sweet love and this is their glorious, magnificent lovechild.

In the old days, if your law office wanted to take credit cards, you would probably have to sign a years-long agreement with a credit card processor and pay exorbitant fees on each transaction. Heck, in even older days, you would have had to use one of those heavy metal machines that used carbon paper. (True story: I saw one of those in use at a restaurant the other day.)

Today? You can take payments online. You can use a reader the size of a nickel that plugs into your smartphone. Or if you're feeling super adventurous, you can try something really new, like Apple Pay or one of the other NFC (tap-your-phone) readers.

Here are a few options, from slightly more old-school to bleeding edge:

We're gadget geeks, so we wait around for every Apple event, but today's event promised big things for even all you normal folks with friends: upgraded Macs. Why is that important? Because Windows 8 is terrible, Windows 10 is a year away, and you might need to upgrade your computers now.

Or maybe you're one of the many folks who run Mac in your law office. Either way, today's event had a lot of new goodies of business users, as well as incremental upgrades for the company's iPad line.

Because we had a big day of writing about judges behaving badly planned, we followed Ars Technica's live blog. Here's what stood out to us:

Every year, like clockwork, Google updates Android with a new version. And every year, without fail, it introduced a new Nexus phone, along with a few other assorted Nexus-branded devices.

Why should you care? Because when it comes to the pure Android experience, Nexus devices are the way to go. They're the first devices to get updates, since they come straight from Google. And, in the past, the devices were far cheaper than their more mainstream counterparts from Samsung and Apple.

How did this year's line stack up? Mildly disappointing, at least in terms of new hardware. But for existing Android owners, the upcoming operating system update (Lollipop) represents a huge leap forward in terms of speed and battery life.

Geeks worldwide flocked to Microsoft's website last week to take part in the company's public beta of the next version of its ubiquitous operating system: Windows 10. However, word quickly spread that the Windows Technical Preview program's terms were far more invasive than the commercial variant, giving Microsoft surprisingly pervasive permission to collect and use your private data, including your keystrokes.

Is the uproar justified? And should you think twice about participating in the program? Let's take a look at the terms and the public's response.

Last year, when Shake debuted, I quipped that we (lawyers) just got replaced by a contract-drafting app. Fortunately, our execution was stayed for a bit -- it took over a year for the app to make the leap from iOS (iPhone and iPad) to the wider world of desktops and Android devices.

Alas, the day of reckoning is at hand: The Android app dropped yesterday. Is it time to burn my bar card and Juris Doctorate? No, not in the least, and not just because there will always be criminals to defend and apps really don't do that (yet).

Shake is a good first step, an app with potential that could come in handy (right now) for a few folks, but it's nowhere near catching up to the dozens of online DIY legal form providers -- yet.

Windows 9/Threshold is here! Except, according to CNET, it'll actually be called Windows 10.

Weird naming conventions are the only surprises here, since we've been stalking leaks via German websites for some time now, but here's the short version of Microsoft's big announcement today: a new version of Windows, smart enough to sense whether you have a keyboard and mouse, is on the way. This is big news for everyone who hated the tablet-centric Windows 8 -- which is nearly everyone, if market share is any indication.

Public betas of the operating system are set to drop as soon as tomorrow, while those of you hoping to buy a PC with Win10 pre-installed may have to wait a little longer.

Ah, those crafty Germans. The fine folks at Winfuture.de (h/t to Ars Technica) are who we have to thank for the latest leaks, videos, and pictures of a developer build of Windows 9.

Windows 9, aka "Threshold," is the upcoming "fix Windows 8" version of the operating system, set for public beta later this month.

What have we learned from the latest leaks? As expected, the Start Menu is back with a ton of customizability -- from bare-bones menu to full-on Windows 8 Start screen. Windows 9 will also pick up a couple of features off of its Apple counterpart: virtual desktops and a notifications center.