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There's going to be some moving and shaking in the Third Circuit, with one judge retiring and two new district court judges recently confirmed. Let's take a look who will be leaving, and who will be joining, the Third Circuit.

Judge Ruggero J. Aldisert Retiring

A native of Pennsylvania, Judge Ruggero J. Aldisert's judicial career began in 1961 as a judge in the Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. In 1968, President Lyndon Johnson nominated Judge Aldisert to the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, and from 1984 to 1986 he served as Chief Judge. He then assumed senior status and moved to California. In August, at the age of 94, Judge Aldisert will retire from the bench.

The tech community is watching the Third Circuit as Andrew "weev" Auernheimer, the hacker people love to hate, appeals his conviction for, as he puts it, "doing arithmetic." And, in more somber news, the Third Circuit lost one of its finest judges on Wednesday, Judge Joseph F. Weis Jr.

Weev's Appeal and Oral Arguments

Weev is currently serving a 41-month sentence for identity theft and conspiracy to commit unauthorized access to a protected computer, in violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act ("CFAA"), when he accessed and leaked 114,000 email addresses of iPad users. On Wednesday, the Third Circuit heard arguments in his appeal.

There's a lot of seat-shifting going on right now in the Third Circuit. Between the Trenton Mayor's removal, BridgeGate, and the tentative selection of a U.S. Bankruptcy Judge, New Jersey is having a hard time staying out of the legal headlines.

Removal of Trenton Mayor Tony Mack

On Wednesday, New Jersey State Superior Court Judge Mary Jacobson removed Trenton Mayor Tony Mack from office, following a jury conviction for fraud, bribery and extortion, all related to government corruption, reports The Associated Press.

The 71st Judicial Conference of the Third Circuit is scheduled for May 7-9, and registration is now open. The conference will be held at the Hershey Lodge in Hershey, Pennsylvania, a/k/a, "The Sweetest Place on Earth®," for all you chocolate lovers (Sidebar: this would be me if I were there).

The Nitty Gritty

If you register before March 1, 2014, the fee for the conference is $395, and the fee goes up to $480 if you register after March 1, and after April 18, 2014, the fee shoots up to $535. Registration includes attendance to the Conference Opening Dinner, a luncheon, three receptions, refreshments during the course of the conference, and eligibility for CLE credits.

Sitting in our sunny outpost in California, we are very sincere when we say that we are happy not to be in your shoes right now. While you've been inundated with snow, and then more snow, California trees think it's spring because of our drought conditions.

But, enough about the weather, let's get down to business. While snow days are expected at schools, sometimes big kids get to take advantage of them too. If you practice in the Third Circuit you may have noticed that court was closed yesterday and today, and any deadlines set for February 13th or 14th, have been extended to Tuesday, February 18, 2014.

Since Phil the groundhog saw his shadow, ensuring us (or you) of six more weeks of winter, here are some tips to get you through the inevitable upcoming snow storms.

On Wednesday, President Obama announced that he intended to nominate Cheryl A. Krause to the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, reports The Washington Times. He stated: "Cheryl Ann Krause has displayed exceptional dedication to the legal profession through her work and I am honored to nominate her to serve the American people as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals," and added, "She will be a diligent, judicious and esteemed addition to the Third Circuit bench."

We had a chance to read her impressive bio and we can see why the President nominated Krause. To learn more about her, read on.

Like the Second Circuit, the Third Circuit holds a special place in my heart as I spent five years of my life in Philadelphia. And though reading Third Circuit opinions does not sate my appetite for cheese steaks or hoagies, there is never a lack of interesting cases coming out of the Third (yes, I'm looking at you Tenth Circuit and Federal Circuit).

Third Circuit in the News

The Third Circuit made headlines with important cases being decided including a student free speech case that centered on students' right to wear bracelets proclaiming "I Heart Boobies" as part of a breast cancer awareness campaign. Also notable, in a warrantless GPS case (with a circuit split brewing) the court held that officers should have first obtained a warrant before affixing a slap-on GPS tracking device to a car. The warrantless GPS decision is awaiting en banc review, and the school district has voted to petition SCOTUS for review, so these will be a hot issues in 2014 as well.

The Center for Public Integrity just released its findings of a study investigating state supreme court justices' financial disclosures. Tellingly, not one state received a grade A or B. The top scorer was California with a grade of C; for the states represented in the Third Circuit, the results were not even C-worthy.

Here is a breakdown of the Third Circuit states' rankings.

New Jersey had the opportunity to persuade the Third Circuit that it should be allowed to offer betting on professional and college sports, reports The Inquirer. With only four other states in the country allowed to wager on sports, many other jurisdictions are watching this case closely to see if they can also get in on the action.

But don't hedge your bets too quickly, New Jersey may have its day in court, but it doesn't mean they'll win.

A girl with cystic fibrosis has a fighting chance for an organ transplant, after a federal judge in Pennsylvania issued a temporary restraining order on Wednesday, allowing the family to place the girl on the adult organ donation list, reports Reuters.

Sarah Murnaghan, 10, isn't the only one receiving judicial intervention, as Javier Acosta, 11, was also granted a temporary injunction by Judge Michael Baylson to waive the federal law limiting the lion's share of transplants to ages 12 and over, reports The Washington Times.

What about the federal organ transplant guidelines did Judge Baylson find offensive?