Are you a legal professional? Visit our professional site

Search for legal issues
For help near (city, ZIP code or county)
Please enter a legal issue and/or a location

Will National Guard Deployment Help Fight Crime?

Article Placeholder Image
By Kamika Dunlap on April 27, 2010 1:04 PM

These days violence has become so rampant on Chicago streets that lawmakers are questioning whether National Guard deployment will help fight crime.

By calling on help from the National Guard, lawmakers are hoping to restore quell the recent surge in violence, according to the Associated Press.

So far, this year Chicago has had 113 homicides and a recent surge in violence that claimed 7 lives. Now, lawmakers are making a public plea to Gov. Pat Quinn for the National Guard to patrol Chicago streets and fight crime, according to the Associate Press.

Democratic Reps. John Fritchey and LaShawn Ford say National Guard deployment can help combat the shootings, killings and crime sprees plaguing some Chicago neighborhoods. In addition, they say the police department's resources are stretched thin.

But Chicago Police Supt. Jody Weis disagreed.

He said the National Guard deployment isn't a solution to city's gun violence.

As previously discussed, Chicago's long-standing handgun ban is under review by the U.S. Supreme Court.

The high court will decide whether the Chicago handgun ban should be invalidated under the Second Amendment in the McDonald v. Chicago case.

A decision by the Supreme Court on whether to strike down the Chicago handgun ban may establish basic ground rules for future gun control efforts in states and cities across the U.S.

Gun-control groups argue that lifting the gun ban will increase gun violence in the Chicago area.

Weis said although he appreciates lawmakers' willingness to to pitch in, they could better help by passing tougher gun control laws, he said.

Lawmakers stressed a call for National Guard help should not be equated with marshal law.

However Weis pointed out that that the military does not operate under the same constitutional constraints as the police.

Some say stricter gun laws would go farther in helping police fight crimes.

Gov. Quinn has not yet commented on the proposal to bring in the National Guard.

Find a Lawyer

More Options