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Oklahoma Women Arrested for Leaving Dog in Hot Car

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By Christopher Coble, Esq. on July 06, 2015 3:59 PM

Finally, bad dog owners are getting what they deserve for abandoning their dogs in hot cars.

Oklahoma police arrested two women after their dog was rescued from a hot car for more than two hours!

Gambling With a Puppy's Life

Last week, Faith and Kandice Williams brought their dog, a Daschund-mix puppy, with them to the Hard Rock Casino. Since pets aren't allowed inside the casino, the two women decided to gamble with the puppy's life, leaving it in the car on a hot day. According to reports, the temperature was over 100 degrees Fahrenheit in the car.

Luckily a man discovered the dog and reported it to casino maintenance. Casino security unlocked the car's door without breaking the window and rescued the puppy.

Faith and Kandice were arrested and charged with cruelty to animals. Oklahoma's animal cruelty law states, "Any person who carries or causes to be carried in or upon any vessel or vehicle ... any animal in a cruel or inhumane manner, or so as to produce torture is guilty of a misdemeanor. If convicted, the women could be punished by a fine of $100 to $500 and a maximum of one year in jail."

Good Samaritan Laws Applied to Saving Animals

Sadly, dogs are left in hot cars all too often. Once in a while, a Good Samaritan steps up to save the poor puppy. However, those Good Samaritans do so at the risk of being sued for property damage or trespass.

Many states' Good Samaritan laws, including Oklahoma's, only provide immunity for damaging a car to help a child trapped inside. The laws do not extend protection to damage caused to save a dog.

Fortunately, a change is starting. Tennessee recently passed a law that would extend Good Samaritan protection to people who break into cars to save dogs. People are required to take certain preliminary steps first before resorting to window smashing. Rescuers should first try to find the owner and call the police. As long as rescuers act reasonably, they will not face civil liability to damaging a car to rescue a dog.

Hopefully, more states will pass similar Good Samaritan laws to protect animal lovers.

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