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Homemade Bombs Target Police and Judge in Indiana

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By Ephrat Livni, Esq. on March 21, 2016 1:58 PM

In a small city south of Indianapolis, a disconcerting pattern seems to be emerging. There were two bombings within two weeks this month, according to the Associated Press, and they appear to be aimed at those in contact with the criminal justice system in Madison, Indiana.

Both bombs were reportedly homemade devices. One targeted a judge at home and the other detonation was in the parking lot of the city hall police department. No one was injured but people are wary. As national authorities investigate, residents and the Madison law enforcement community wait nervously.

Same Source?

The police in Madison believe that both bombs were made by the same person or people. But they have also called in the big guns -- namely, the national Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. It is investigating the devices and the manner of detonation to determine how the bombs were made and by whom. There are no suspects so far.

Both explosions occurred at night and no one was injured. If the bombs had been detonated by day, however, this story might not read the same. "It was not an extensive amount of damage," said Special Agent Kim Riddell of the US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. "It certainly could pose a danger if someone was in close proximity."

Is There More?

Madison police are concerned that this is not the end and that there may be more bombs targeting them and others like them. Neither explosion came with a threat in advance or warning. "We are considering these explosions as a message and a direct threat to members of the criminal justice system in our local community," Madison Police Chief Dan Thurston told a news conference.

The targeted judge, Michael Hensley, elected to the judiciary in 2014, is holding up well, according to his son, who spoke to reporters about the explosion. Evan Hensley said that he heard a noise about 3 a.m. and was not even aware it was a bomb going off.

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