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Recently in DUI/ DWI Category

December was declared National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month in 2000. Since then, it has been changed to National Impaired Driving Prevention Month, reflecting a shift in how we view DUIs, DWIs, and the widening influence of legalized narcotics and prescription drugs on our ability to drive responsibly.

So perhaps it's a good time to look at how DUI laws and impaired driving enforcement have been changing recently:

Drunk, Sleeping Driver Pulled Over in Tesla

The Northern California Bay Area has more than its fair share of Tesla drivers, but some have garnered more notoriety than others. In the latest incident of Tesla Drivers Behaving Badly, it took police seven minutes of skilled maneuvering to pull over Alexander Samek, after he was found asleep, and drunk, at the wheel of his Tesla Model S, traveling 70 miles per hour down the freeway at 3:30 a.m. with his autopilot engaged.

How Long Does a DUI Stay on Your Record?

DUIs are problematic, and affect so many facets of life. Once you've dealt with the legal ramifications, including the penalties, you may think it's all behind you and look forward to a fresh start. But when does that freshness start? That depends on where you live.

DUIs end up on all sorts of records, such as your driving record with the DMV, your criminal record with the state, and maybe even your employment record with your employer. It's in your best interest to know how long a DUI stays on your record and what you can, and can't, do about it.

It's too cold to walk home. My wife and I are trying to get pregnant. I'll get fired if I don't get to work. I'm the designated driver. Those are just a few of some ridiculous reasons drunk drivers have offered to just one officer when getting pulled over.

Here are five of our favorites that we've had the joy to write about over the years. But just remember -- while these DUI excuses may be hilarious, driving drunk is anything but.

The holiday season always approaches fast. First Thanksgiving. Then Hanukkah, Christmas, and Kwanzaa. And then right on into New Year's Eve and Day. A time for celebration, sure. But a time for crime as well.

There a natural spike in crime around the holidays, from the intentional -- targeting vacant homes and overstuffed businesses -- to the unintentional -- one too many beers or egg nogs before driving. Shoplifting may be up (surprise, surprise) as well as domestic incidents brought on by family or financial stress. So before the holidays descend upon us, here's how to keep yourself out of trouble, and what to do if you can't.

Over 20K DUI Cases in New Jersey May Be Tossed After Court Ruling

Some 20,000 convicted DUI drivers may be raising their glasses today to Sgt. Marc Dennis. The officer was found guilty of not calibrating breath testing devices correctly back in 2016. These devices were used in five New Jersey counties, including Middlesex, Monmouth, Union, Ocean, and Somerset. As a result, all convictions based on breath tested by Dennis can now be challenged.

A "wobbler," in criminal procedure parlance, is a crime that can be charged as either a misdemeanor or a felony. That discretion is normally left up to prosecutors, although in some states judges may reduce felonies to misdemeanors under certain circumstances.

When it comes to DUIs, most drunk driving offenses are misdemeanors but may be bumped up to felonies depending on the specifics of the case. So, what makes a DUI a wobbler? And why does that matter to you?

Police often step up their drunk driving enforcement around holidays. That only makes sense -- more people tend to drink before, during, and after holiday celebrations, and keeping them off the road keeps everyone safe. One tactic is scaring people off drunk driving before they get behind the wheel. So police departments nationwide are announcing their Halloween drunk driving task forces.

"As always, the best choice someone can make, should they plan on consuming alcoholic beverages, is to find some other form of transportation that does not involve them operating a motor vehicle," according to a statement from five Arizona law enforcement agencies teaming up to catch drunk drivers over the next week. Here are a few other helpful hints to make sure a Halloween DUI doesn't haunt your forever:

While drunk driving arrests are all too common, each DUI case is unique, meaning the possible penalties you could face when charged with drunk driving will vary depending on the specifics of your case. There are, however, some general rules that prosecutors and courts follow when charging, plea bargaining, and punishing DUI offenses.

Here's a look at some of the most common questions regarding DUI penalties, and the most common punishments for DUI convictions.

What to Know About Nevada's New DUI Law

In most states, after you receive a DUI but before your court date, you are occasionally allowed to drive for about 30 days after the arrest, pending trial. Sometimes, in extreme cases, such as felony DUI, a temporary license won't be issued. But for the most part, you are innocent until proven guilty. But not in Nevada. Starting October 1, the state changed its DUI laws, requiring an interlock device after arrest.