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Michael Jordan's Marriage License Good for 60 Days

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By Andrew Lu on March 08, 2013 9:43 AM

Looks like Michael Jordan is going to get married again, probably sometime in the next 60 days.

The six-time NBA champion and current owner of the Charlotte Bobcats appeared at a courthouse in Palm Beach County, Florida, to apply for a marriage license, reports The Associated Press.

Jordan is engaged to his longtime girlfriend, Cuban model Yvette Prieto. If the pair tie the knot, it will be Jordan's second marriage. He was married to Juanita Vanoy for 17 years, and they have three children together.

To get married in Florida, you will need a marriage license. Marriage licenses are typically issued by counties and you have to apply for a license at a county clerk's office. You'll need to provide certain personal information to obtain a license such as a picture identification and Social Security number. You will also need to pay the applicable fees.

Once you are processed, you will get a marriage license which, in Florida, is valid for 60 days. This means that Michael Jordan and Yvette Prieto will have to get married by May 9, or they'll have to apply for another license, the AP reports.

For couples who plan to get married at a city hall or county courthouse in Florida, you may be able to apply for the license on the day of your marriage ceremony -- that is, if you have completed a pre-martial course. Otherwise, you have to wait three days after getting your marriage license to officially tie the knot.

There are other considerations as well. Before Michael Jordan gets married, he should strongly consider a prenuptial agreement. This is not to doubt the strength of his relationship with Prieto, but the reality is that about one-half of American couples get divorced.

And given Jordan's obvious wealth and earning capacity, he may want to protect himself as well as his three children. A prenuptial agreement can protect Jordan's interests in the Bobcats and can specify in advance how marital property will be divided if the couple eventually splits.

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