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Nate Dogg Child Support Battle Continues 2 Years After His Death

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By Betty Wang, JD on June 11, 2013 10:40 AM

Nate Dogg's estate is at the center of a child support battle. Two of the late rapper-singer's baby mamas, Rhoda Mouton and Omena Norris, are involved in a posthumous child support lawsuit.

Mouton, the mother of Nate Dogg's teenage son, is currently attempting to deny Norris' request for more child support payments. (Norris gave birth to Nate Dogg's child in 2006.) Mouton claims that Norris has no valid reason for requesting that her support be increased by $200 a month. Instead, Mouton wants Norris' payments cut in half, to about $800 a month, according to Vibe.

As if the late rapper hadn't seen enough troubles in his lifetime, does Nate Dogg still owe child support, even two years after his death?

Child Support After Death

Nate Dogg, whose real name was Nathaniel Dwayne Hale, died in 2011 after suffering multiple strokes. He was 41 years old.

When a parent who has an obligation to pay child support dies, the responsibility to pay does not. In other words, the deceased parent's estate is usually still responsible for child support, one way or the other. This is also probably what the parent would have preferred, too.

While the rules for child support after parent has died vary by state, all states generally uphold the rule that child support payments are a valid claim against the deceased parent's estate. That usually includes all of the parent's assets, like their house, cars, and bank accounts.

Other Potential Sources of Support

Some other sources for child support involve looking at the father or mother's life insurance policy and how to collect on that.

A court may also examine the parent's other sources of income during life, including employment and perhaps even Social Security.

Regardless of what the source of child support payments is for Nate Dogg's two children, the bottom line is that his estate does still owe support payments to the mothers.

A judge has not yet issued a final ruling on Norris' request for more child support, or Mouton's efforts to scale back that support.

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