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Chris Brown's Probation Revoked, so Why Is He Not in Jail?

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By Brett Snider, Esq. on July 16, 2013 1:25 PM

R&B legend and occasional court attendee Chris Brown appeared Monday before a Los Angeles judge who revoked the singer's probation.

After reviewing the details of Brown's alleged hit-and-run in May, the judge revoked his felony probation, which he received for beating off-and-on girlfriend Rihanna in 2009. But Brown was not ordered to jail, reports The Associated Press.

So why isn't Chris Brown behind bars for violating his probation, and what's next for the misbehaving singer?

Probation Revoked

The "Don't Wake Me Up" singer appeared in court on a prosecutor's motion to revoke his probation in light of his recent hit-and-run, which the judge granted, reports TMZ

Often probation isn't revoked until after a probation revocation hearing, but a judge may pre-emptively revoke probation in anticipation of the hearing.

Brown's next hearing date is set for August 16, which may give the pop star and his lawyer time to "informally" resolve the issue without a formal probation hearing, reports the AP.

Yet He Walks Free

While Brown is awaiting his hearing in August, he isn't counting the days inside a jail cell. That's because probationers can often be released on their own recognizance while awaiting either sentencing or a revocation hearing.

If or when Brown manages to find himself in this situation again, a judge viewing a probation violation may impose bail on the "F.A.M.E." singer, which he could likely afford.

Release on one's "own recognizance" isn't without certain strings, and if Brown says "Deuces!" to his next court appearance, the judge may issue a bench warrant for his arrest.

Possible Punishments

When August rolls around, Brown may be facing an extended grant of probation or even four years in prison, reports TMZ.

Whether Chris Brown gets jail time or not for his latest car mischief is largely left to the judge, who has wide discretion to consider Brown's criminal history and the nature of his probation violation in formulating a sentence.

But for now, the "Run It!" singer can walk free.

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