'The Good Wife': Good Law? - Season 6, Episode 6

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By Daniel Taylor, Esq. on October 27, 2014 6:01 PM

As Alicia Florrick's campaign for state's attorney starts picking up speed, last night's episode, entitled "Old Spice," finds her having to confront her spirituality, or lack thereof.

While Alicia attempts to find a more palatable way to frame her previously stated atheistic views, this episode focuses on the long-simmering mutual admiration between newly returned Elsbeth Tascioni and Assistant U.S. Attorney Josh Perroti, played by the suitably smarmy Kyle MacLachlan.

Episode Recap (Spoiler Alert!):

Picking up where last week left off, "Old Spice" features Alicia and Elsbeth teaming up to defend the ex-CEO of technology company J-Serve against charges the company stole trade secrets from another company. As the trial continues, however, it becomes clear that the government is really building a case against J-Serve for economic espionage. More importantly, AUSA Perotti continues to press Elsbeth for the opportunity to consummate their somewhat awkward attraction, which eventually results in an equally awkward desktop love scene.

The Good Wife: Good Law?

Season 6, Episode 6
"Old Spice"

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Meanwhile, Diane successfully evicts Lockhart, Gardner and Canning from their offices with the help of Kalinda, who discovers a loophole within the loophole David Lee and Louis Canning had tried to use to prevent the eviction. However, that success is offset by Cary's near-revocation of bail after he gets caught leaving the state. Although he is able to remain free, his new bail conditions include being prohibited from contact with Kalinda. If that sounds like a lot of different storylines to juggle in 45 minutes, you're right: It is.

Legal Roots:

The case against J-Serve for economic espionage is mainly a vehicle to allow AUSA Perotti and Elsbeth to interact both in court and on top of Elsbeth's desk. But cases involving U.S. trade secrets finding their way to China are all too real. In 2012, a former software engineer for Motorola was caught with thousands of stolen proprietary documents while attempting to board a one-way flight to China. She was sentenced to four years in federal prison.

Legal Fact:

When AUSA Perotti tells Elsbeth that an incriminating conversation she recorded on her iPhone would be inadmissible in court, Elsbeth tells him that Illinois law now only requires the consent of one party to a conversation. Illinois had formerly required the consent of all parties to a conversation for a recording, but earlier this year, the state's eavesdropping act was struck down as unconstitutional.

Legal Babble:

Ankle monitoring bracelet: As a condition of Cary's continued release on bail, he is required to wear an ankle monitoring bracelet. Electronic GPS monitoring allows law enforcement to track the exact location of an offender 24 hours a day. In addition to those free on bail or on house arrest, electronic monitoring can also be used to track high-risk offenders after their release.

The Verdict:

With multiple plotlines zigging and zagging simultaneously, "Old Spice" smells a little funky at times. But as usual, solid performances by a talented cast keep "The Good Wife" from going bad.

What did you think of this week's episode of "The Good Wife"? Is the show guilty of making any legal mistakes? Check back here for more legal recaps of "The Good Wife," and send us a tweet at @FindLawConsumer with the hashtag #TheGoodWife.

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