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'Sharknado' Actress Tara Reid Sues Producers for $100M

Tara Reid filed a misappropriation suit against SYFY Media Productions and Asylum Entertainment for using her likeness on Sharknado-branded beer bottles and slot machines without her permission. Reid appeared in all six Sharknado films as lead character, April Wexler. These films were broadcast on the SYFY television network, dating back to 2013. Reid is suing for $100 million, primarily in punitive damages, which she describes as "an amount sufficiently large to set a public example of deterrence."

Bobby Brown Sues Showtime for Misappropriation of Publicity Rights

Bobby Brown is suing Showtime Networks, BBC, and the producers of Whitney Houston's documentary Can I Be Me? for misappropriation of publicity rights, among other causes of action, for using footage of Brown, and their daughter Bobbi Kristina Brown (BKB). Bobby Brown's suit, filed in a federal court in New York, is seeking an injunction as well as $2 million in damages.

New allegations against Harvey Weinstein claim the disgraced movie mogul forced a then-16-year-old Polish model to touch his penis days after they'd met at a modeling agency, and later subjected her to years of harassment and emotional abuse, allegedly blocking her from a successful acting career as payback for refusing his advances.

The claims, made in a civil lawsuit filed by the victim identified only as "Jane Doe", fall in line with other accusers, who have accused Weinstein of leveraging his power in the movie industry to extort sex from women and derail careers of those that resisted.

Usher Hush-Hush on Herpes Suits

One of several women who have filed civil suits against Usher Raymond for allegedly infecting them with herpes claims the singer is purposefully delaying mediation in the case, citing his "failure to cooperate" on scheduling and arbitration issues. Quantasia Sharpton filed documents in her litigation blaming Usher and his legal team of "dilatory tactics and failure to cooperate in scheduling a mediation."

So legal questions dogging the singer and actor since last year don't look like they're going away any time soon.

We've poked some fun at former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice and senate candidate Roy Moore before -- both for his brutal hazing as a first-year law student (he garnered the nickname "fruit salad" from a professor after mixed-up answers to questions) and for his quixotic crusade against gay marriage in Alabama (earning repeated slap-downs from federal courts). It turns out we're not the only ones.

Sacha Baron Cohen, disguised as fictional Israeli anti-terrorism expert Erran Morad, interviewed Moore on his Showtime series "Who Is America?" and demonstrated a supposed "pedophile detector" that beeped when waved near him. Moore didn't find it funny, and is now suing Cohen, Showtime, and parent company CBS for defamation, to the tune of $95 million.

Why Lawsuits Against Sacha Baron Cohen Fail

Sacha Baron Cohen is taking heat up and down from conservatives over his portrayal of numerous "right-wing" public figures on his Who Is America? series. Many have sued or threatened to sue. Will they win? It's highly doubtful. Why? Because he interviews public figures that have probably signed a release.

Few celebrities were at such a pinnacle of popularity in 2016 as Kevin Hart. Which is no doubt why mobile app developer Stand Up Digital wanted to team up with Hart to release "Gold Ambush," a multiplayer game featuring both Hart and his wife and children as playable characters.

And few celebrity images took such a precipitous fall as Hart's when he tearfully revealed an affair on his Instagram account in September 2017, just days before Gold Ambush's planned release. That admission, according to a lawsuit filed by Stand Up, "crippled the efficacy of Gold Ambush, completely destroyed all of Stand Up's pre-launch monetary commitments, shuttered the credibility of the game as a family-oriented entertainment ... and nullified the future profitability of the game." The company is looking for over $7 million in damages.

Sasha Baron Cohen can trick even the trickiest politicians. But former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore says Cohen has gone too far, and is threatening a defamation suit if he doesn't like the way he is portrayed in an upcoming episode of "Who Is America?" a Showtime series which debuted last week to modest reviews. Moore is already involved in a defamation lawsuit against four women who raised +30-year-old allegations of sexual misconduct during his recent unsuccessful U.S. Senate race.

Frida Kahlo's Family Tries to Block Frida-Themed Barbie Doll

If you don't know her work, you at least know her unibrow. Frida Kahlo's popularity has grown over the years, thanks to both her art and her outspoken views on politics and the like. And while one company wants to honor her with a Frida-themed Barbie doll (and make a few bucks in the process), her family is not happy with those efforts and is trying to block the doll in court.

One of the limitations on free speech is defamation -- you can't simply make false and damaging statements about someone else. That said, just because information tends to damage a person's reputation doesn't make it defamation. The statement must also be false.

Additionally, the press are afforded some increased legal protections in the interest of reporting the news, and public figures are afforded fewer protections as they thrust themselves into the public eye and invite close scrutiny. Both factors could come into play in Steve Wynn's defamation against the Associated Press, with the casino mogul claiming the AP reported "false accusations of rape."