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There May be Arsenic in Your Apple Juice

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By Admin on December 06, 2011 5:49 AM

Before you take a sip of your favorite fruit beverage, be warned. There may be arsenic in your apple juice. About 10% of sampled fruit juices in a new Consumer Reports study was found to contain arsenic and lead. The levels found were higher than those allowed in federal drinking-water standards, which is stricter than FDA rules for juices.

The study went through 88 different samples of apple and grape juices. Samples were taken from juices purchased at stores in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut.

What was found was troubling: 10% had arsenic levels higher than the federal limit for water. 25% had lead levels higher than the federal limit.

The study also found that the arsenic was inorganic. This means that it's a carcinogen, reports Fox News.

Arsenic is naturally found, and can get into water from runoff as it's used in some industries. Low level exposure to the compound can change the color of a person's skin, and can cause some skin irritation like corns or warts. High levels of arsenic can be fatal.

The FDA has long regulated the amount of arsenic in drinking water and juices. Specifically, it limits the amount of inorganic drinking water to 10 parts per billion (ppb). Juice has a higher arsenic limit at 23 ppb. The rationale for the limits was that people drink more water than juices.

In response to the study's findings the FDA released a written statement stating that it would look into collecting additional data, reports MSNBC. A spokesman for the Juice Products Association said that if the FDA changed its standards manufacturers would comply.

Does arsenic in your apple juice make it dangerous to drink? The FDA says it's still safe, despite the Consumer Reports study.

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