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Nestle's Bottled Water Filled With Microplastics, Lawsuit Claims�

When it comes to healthy living, weight loss, getting in shape, and the like, we're constantly being told to drink more water. But what if even your water isn't good for you?

A class action lawsuit filed against Nestle claims that the company engaged in deceptive marketing because their bottled water, Pure Life, is not so pure and contains microplastics, according to a recent study.

It's a pretty common assumption: you walk into a fast food establishment, see combo meals on the menu, and assume that the meal is less expensive than buying each of the items individually. After all, that's why they're called "value meals," right? But our parents have all told us what happens when you assume, and it's apparently common knowledge that McDonald's Extra Value Meals actually cost more than the individually priced items.

But that didn't stop one Illinois woman from suing McDonald's, claiming the chain is tricking customers into paying more for food they could have bought at a lower cost, in violation of state consumer fraud statutes. But a federal judge disagreed. Here's why:

Tootsie Roll Sued for Consumer Fraud Over Half-Empty Junior Mints Box

Opening a box of candy only to find it half full feels like a cruel joke. It's akin to unwrapping a giant present on Christmas morning, but discovering a lone pair of fuzzy socks enclosed within. It's nice and all, but not what you expected. A similarly unhappy customer is taking her partially-filled box of Jr. Mints to court and suing Tootsie Roll for consumer fraud.

Researchers at Consumer Reports think they've discovered the source of a deadly E. coli outbreak in the U.S. and Canada last week: romaine lettuce. The outbreak began in November 2017 and has sickened dozens, hospitalized five, and killed at least two people.

While the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention was careful not to link the outbreak to a specific source before further inquiry, the Public Health Agency of Canada was confident in identifying romaine lettuce as the source of the outbreak. So why are people getting sick, what should they do, and can you file a wrongful death lawsuit for E. coli poisoning?

We all want to reward our very good dogs. We just don't want choking, vomiting, or diarrhea to be part of that reward. And if you're giving your good dog a "bone treat," according to the FDA, that's exactly what they might get.

"Giving your dog a bone treat might lead to an unexpected trip to your veterinarian, a possible emergency surgery, or even death for your pet," says FDA veterinarian Carmela Stamper. So read this before filling your dog's stocking full of Christmas treats.

For those of us who don't want to be trampled at the door of a box store on Black Friday, there's Cyber Monday, the day we can feed the capitalist consumption machine from the safety of our homes, phones, and cubicles.

And while we may not need to worry as much about our physical wellbeing on Cyber Monday, our online health is at a far greater risk. Shopping scams, Wi-Fi hackers, and data theft can ruin your holiday deal treasure hunt. So before you start getting click-happy this Cyber Monday, here are a few tips to keep your online shopping safe:

We all know that soda is bad for us. The sugar, the high fructose corn syrup, and phosphoric acid (!) can't be too healthy. But diet soda, on the other hand, is better, right? Fewer calories mean diet sodas might actually help us maintain a healthy weight or even lose weight, right?

Wrong, according to three federal lawsuits filed against the three largest makers of carbonated beverages in the U.S. Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, and Dr Pepper Snapple Group, are all being sued for their marketing of diet sodas that plaintiffs claim mislead consumers into thinking those beverages are healthy, or at least healthier than regular soda.

When most of us buy a pet, we like to think we're saving it from a horrible life in a pen, or worse. And animal shelters rely on the good intentions of pet owners to place animals in good homes. But in California, those good intentions have become law.

Governor Jerry Brown this week announced the signing of Assembly Bill No. 485, requiring pet stores to sell only rescue animals. The law is aimed at ending the practice of so-called "puppy mills," and makes the Golden State the first to enact such a law. So what does the new law actually prohibit, and what are the penalties?

Everyone's favorite big box warehouse retailer, Costco, is learning a very expensive lesson in the jewelry business: There's big difference between a "Tiffany" ring, and a ring with a "Tiffany setting." The difference is so great, Costco's going to have pay Tiffany & Co. nearly $20 million.

World famous jeweler, Tiffany & Co., won their infringement case against the retailer on summary judgment by convincingly proving this point. While jewelers across the world use, and advertise certain rings as having, a "Tiffany setting," Costco advertised their rings with the world famous setting as "Tiffany" rings, rather than rings with a "Tiffany setting." When Tiffany & Co. discovered this after Valentine's Day 2013, the case against Costco was filed.

According to investigative journalists at ABC 11 in Durham, North Carolina, a popular powder makeup marketed to teens may contain asbestos and other harmful ingredients. The team sent "Just Shine Shimmer Powder," sold at Justice Stores, to the Scientific Analytical Institute in Greensboro, where samples of the makeup tested positive for four heavy metals, including asbestos.

"I would treat it like a deadly poison, because it is," Sean Fitzgerald, the Director of Research and Analytical Services told the station. "In this powder designed for children, they could die an untimely death in their thirties or forties because of the exposure to asbestos in this product."