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Recently in Consumer Rights Category

Not everyone loves Facebook's suggestions when it comes to tagging people in photos. On top of that, those suggestions may be illegal. That's what we learned from a recent ruling in a class action lawsuit filed against Facebook over its use of facial recognition.

A federal judge in California allowed the lawsuit to proceed, ruling that Facebook may have violated an Illinois law limiting the collection of biometric information, but limited the potential class of plaintiffs at the same time. Here's a look.

It's a pretty common assumption: you walk into a fast food establishment, see combo meals on the menu, and assume that the meal is less expensive than buying each of the items individually. After all, that's why they're called "value meals," right? But our parents have all told us what happens when you assume, and it's apparently common knowledge that McDonald's Extra Value Meals actually cost more than the individually priced items.

But that didn't stop one Illinois woman from suing McDonald's, claiming the chain is tricking customers into paying more for food they could have bought at a lower cost, in violation of state consumer fraud statutes. But a federal judge disagreed. Here's why:

Burrito Delight Sued Over Salmonella Outbreak

It's never fun getting food poisoning, but usually it passes within a few days. Sometimes, however, you end up with a severe case that can take much longer to recover from and have a significant impact on your life. When that happens, you may have the right to a legal remedy. Dawn Malek is one person affected by food poisoning who has decided to take legal action. She has filed a lawsuit against Burrito Delight, which is currently being investigated for a salmonella outbreak that occurred in February.

Anti-Aging Claims of TA-65MD Challenged by FTC

Most people want to be able to stay young, and while some people turn to surgery to stop the aging process, others use various creams and serums that promise anti-aging properties. Unfortunately, not all anti-aging products actually stop or reverse the aging process.

Take for example TA-65MD and TA-for 65 Skin sold by Telomerase Activation Sciences and its CEO, Noel Thomas Patton. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), these products lack scientific substantiation for their anti-aging claims.

Woman Charged $17,850 for Urine Test

How much should you pay to pee in a cup? A Texas woman's case has made headlines after her seemingly routine, post-surgical urine test came back at $17,850 dollars. 

It's part of an unwelcome trend in the drug testing industry that some link to the opioid crisis. Others just chalk it up as part of America's broken healthcare system. Lawyers link it to the exorbitant, and sometimes fraudulent, billing practices in the healthcare industry.

After the housing bubble burst way back in 2008, big banks had quite a few foreclosures on their hands. Only they didn't do a great job of managing those foreclosures. In 2011, the Federal Reserve found banks like Ally Financial, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, Morgan Stanley, and SunTrust botched thousands of foreclosures and ordered them to tidy up their mortgage servicing.

And now, finally, in 2018, the Fed has finalized its enforcement action against the remaining banks, fining five of them a total of $35.1 million.

Researchers at Consumer Reports think they've discovered the source of a deadly E. coli outbreak in the U.S. and Canada last week: romaine lettuce. The outbreak began in November 2017 and has sickened dozens, hospitalized five, and killed at least two people.

While the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention was careful not to link the outbreak to a specific source before further inquiry, the Public Health Agency of Canada was confident in identifying romaine lettuce as the source of the outbreak. So why are people getting sick, what should they do, and can you file a wrongful death lawsuit for E. coli poisoning?

If you google 'AARP elder abuse,' your first 30 or so results are pages of the American Association of Retired Persons' efforts to combat the emotional and financial abuse of elderly people. But the same non-profit that touts its efforts to protect elders is now being sued for defrauding them.

A new class action lawsuit filed in California accuses AARP of elder financial abuse, claiming it has been taking kickbacks from UnitedHealth Group for selling AARP-branded health insurance plans, overcharging its members in the process.

The class action lawsuit is one of the few tools consumers and the public have against misbehaving large corporations. They've been utilized in environmental protection cases against polluters and consumer safety cases against dangerous products. A proposed new rule would allow similar protections for victims of predatory, deceptive, or unfair business practices by banks and other financial institutions, but that rule was voted down today.

Vice President Mike Pence broke a 50-50 tie in the Senate as Republicans continue to roll back Obama-era policies designed to reign in Wall Street.

As great man once said, "There's a time and place for everything -- and it's called college." And in a place where anything can happen, not all of those things are good.

From flood damage and pranks gone wrong, to simple theft or misappropriation, some bad things can happen to a college student's dorm room. Does that mean they need to insure those rooms, and their belongings?