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According to a new lawsuit filed in California, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services has been ignoring Freedom of Information Act requests regarding significant delays in processing citizenship applications. And according to the immigrant rights groups that filed the suit, the delay is part of an effort to deny "thousands of lawful permanent residents the opportunity to more fully participate in civic life and to vote in important upcoming elections."

The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights, National Partnership for New Americans, and Mi Familia Vota, among others, claim "extreme vetting of naturalization applications and delays in the processing of [citizenship] applications has created a backlog of over 753,000 applications," and they are seeking government documents justifying the government's action. You can see their lawsuit below:

In 2009, the National Academy of Sciences released a report concluding that almost all commonly used forensic techniques, including handwriting analysis, have never been properly scientifically tested. And yet, the State of New Hampshire was requiring untrained local election moderators review and compare handwritten signatures on absentee ballots, and reject ballots with questionable signatures.

That practice will now be ended, after a federal court ruled the procedure unconstitutional. The court found "the current process for rejecting voters due to a signature mismatch fails to guarantee basic fairness," and you can see the full ruling below:

In June, the Supreme Court vacated a Colorado Civil Rights Commission decision finding that Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, violated the civil rights of a gay couple by refusing to bake a same-sex couple a cake for their wedding. Rather than ruling that business owners have a right to discriminate against customers based on sexual orientation or gender identity, the Court found that the Commission was too hostile to Phillips' claims of religious beliefs.

Just a few short weeks later, Phillips and his cake shop are back in court, this time over his refusal to bake a cake for an attorney celebrating the anniversary of her decision to come out as transgender. Although the incident occurred a year before the Supreme Court ruling, Colorado cited Phillips for again violating state civil rights laws by declining to create that cake. Now he is suing the state and government officials, claiming "Colorado has been on a crusade to crush [him] because its officials despise what he believes and how he practices his faith."

You can see the suit below.

By now, one would think judges are familiar with the process of transgender children changing their name, and that, absent some improper motive, judges must grant these petitions. And yet ...

Three mothers have filed a federal lawsuit against Juvenile Court Judge Joseph W. Kirby in Ohio, claiming he "has a pattern and practice of treating name change requests from transgender adolescents differently than other name change requests," and denying every request he hears. You can see the full lawsuit below.

Mentorship and guidance programs for middle and high school students can be extremely valuable to a young person's development, but programs that "guide" a student into the criminal justice system can have equally negative effects. One such program in Riverside, California, known as the Youth Accountability Team Program, is being accused of funneling children who haven't committed a crime into criminal-like probation programs for poor grades, being tardy to school or "defiant," using "inappropriate language," being "easily persuaded by peers," or "pulling the race card."

And the ACLU is helping to sue the County of Riverside and its probation department, seeking to end what it calls an "astonishingly punitive and ineffective law enforcement program." You can see the full lawsuit below.

The Supreme Court today ruled that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission violated Jack Phillips' First Amendment rights to the free exercise of religion in the way it dismissed his religious reasoning for denying service to a same-sex couple who requested a cake for their wedding.

While the Court was careful not to rule that wedding vendors and other business owners have a right to refuse service to same-sex couples, it did say the state agency reviewing the case "showed elements of a clear and impermissible hostility toward the sincere religious beliefs motivating [Phillips'] objection." Therefore, the finding that Phillips violated Colorado's anti-discrimination laws was invalidated.

You can read the Supreme Court's full opinion, and its reasoning, below.

Few people, let alone presidents, use Twitter quite like Donald Trump. And now that he is president, Trump's Twitter use has a way of ruffling a few (ahem) feathers. His account can also be a lightning rod for some unsavory or unwelcome tweets. While the rest of us on Twitter would just block other users whose tweets become annoying, argumentative, or even abusive, President Trump no longer has that luxury.

A federal judge has ruled that blocking Twitter users from seeing Trump's @realDonaldTrump account violates the First Amendment. Here's the judge's ruling:

Former Essex County College professor Lisa Durden was defending the decision of Black Lives Matter to exclude white people from a Memorial Day Event to Fox News' Tucker Carlson last year when she said: "What I say to that is, 'Boo hoo hoo.' You white people are angry because you couldn't use your 'white privilege' card to get invited to the Black Lives Matter's all-black Memorial Day celebration."

Two days later she was told to cancel a class and suspended, and three weeks after her television appearance, she was fired. Durden is now suing the school and administrators, claiming it violated her free speech rights, created a hostile work environment, and breached her contract. Here's the lawsuit.

The New York Police Department settled another lawsuit involving widespread surveillance of Muslim communities in New York, New Jersey, and beyond. The spying program, which spanned a decade and targeted hundreds of individuals, businesses, and mosques, failed to produce a single, actionable lead in a criminal investigation.

It did, however, consist of several constitutional violations, which the NYPD has promised to correct under the settlement, as well as compensate victims monetarily. You can read the full settlement, along with the allegations, below.

Kayla Cuevas' mother claims her daughter was "subjected to continuous and ongoing bullying" for years while a student in Brentwood, New York. The numerous incidents happened on school grounds in the Brentwood Union School District and were perpetrated by MS-13 gang members, Evelyn Rodriguez claims, with full knowledge of the school district.

Cuevas was killed, allegedly by MS-13 members, in September 2016, and Rodriguez is suing the school district, claiming it failed to stop the bullying and protect her daughter from gang violence. You can see the lawsuit below: