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According to some, the potential for stem cell therapy to treat chronic diseases and serious medical conditions is limitless. According to California Stem Cell Treatment Center, its stem cell products could treat cancer, arthritis, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, macular degeneration, Parkinson's disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes, just to name a few.

And, according to the Food and Drug Administration, California Stem Cell Treatment Center ("CSCTC") never got approval that those treatments were either safe or effective. So the FDA is now suing California Stem Cell and another clinic in Florida in an effort to block them from marketing unproven treatments to thousands of patients. You can see the California lawsuit below.

Stone Brewing Co. Sues MillerCoors in Brewing Battle

It's a David versus Goliath fight brewing in the beer world. Stone Brewing Co., the San Diego based craft beer brewer, is suing industry giant MillerCoors. The recently filed lawsuit claims that MillerCoors' rebrand of its "Keystone" beers as simply "Stone" violates Stone Brewing Co.'s trademarks.

James Brown gave the world a trove of classic soul music before he passed away in 2006. But he also left quite a mess in his personal life and estate. And now six of Brown's biological children are suing his allegedly bigamous surviving spouse, claiming she "embarked on a series of duplicitous business machinations calculated to deprive Brown's children of their rightful interests in Brown's music under the Copyright Act and divert the financial proceeds from such interests to herself."

You can read the full lawsuit, along with some salacious allegations, below.

Just because a currency is digital doesn't mean it can't be taxed. And the Internal Revenue Service is looking for cryptocurrency buyers and sellers come tax time.

A federal court in California has ordered one virtual currency exchange, Coinbase, to hand over identifying records for almost 10,000 users who bought, sold, sent, or received more than $20,000 of digital currency through their accounts. And those users will likely need to pay taxes on those transactions. You can read the full order below:

Everything in moderation, including moderation. It's generally a good rule in life, as well as when it comes to imbibing alcohol. And one distillery thought they had some even better advice: drink our vodka, infused with "safe additives that provide protective effects."

There's just one problem -- the regulatory agencies in control of labeling weren't too keen on some of the statements included on the vodka bottles. So now the company is suing, claiming the agencies violated the company's First Amendment rights as well as their own internal policies.

Muhammad Ali passed away in June 2016, eight months before Super Bowl LI kicked off in February 2017. But Ali still left his mark on the big game, appearing in a three-minute promotional ad for Fox before the game, an ad that, according to a $30 million lawsuit against the broadcaster, "uses Ali to define greatness and ultimately to compare the NFL legends to Ali and thus to define them and the Super Bowl as 'greatness' too."

The only problem with that ad? Fox didn't clear it first with Muhammad Ali Enterprises LLC, which owns Ali's trademark rights, copyrights, right of publicity, and all other intellectual property rights. Hence the lawsuit, which you can see below:

We all scream for ice cream, that's just a fact. And we also all scream when we're inundated with spam calls and text messages from companies, so much so that we passed a law against it. The Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) banning automated or prerecorded calls without consent. But according to a new class action lawsuit, Baskin-Robbins, one of the nation's largest purveyors of frozen treats has been flooding customers with text message ads, in violation of the TCPA.

You can see the full lawsuit below:

One inevitable outcome to manufacturing driverless cars is that there will nonetheless be lawsuits if and when those cars get into accidents. And if there's no "driver" to sue, those lawsuits will be undoubtedly be aimed at the manufacturer.

One driverless car manufacturer is trying to avoid liability for several accidents, essentially arguing "to err is human." Tesla says that no manufacturer has been expected to build a perfectly accident-free automobile, especially in the face of human error, nor should it be expected to design a car, even a driverless one, that can overcome those human errors. You can see their full legal filing below:

Most of us are skeptical when buying a used car -- we want the CARFAX report and we don't always believe salesmen's assurances that a car on their lot is safe. But the "Certified Pre-Owned" distinction is meant to allay those fears -- after all, the CARFAX website itself calls them "the low-cost alternative to a new car, or as a low-risk option to a used car." But it turns out CPOs might not be as safe as you'd think.

A federal lawsuit alleges the Federal Trade Commission allowed dealers to market and advertise certified pre-owned vehicles as "safe," even when the same vehicles were subject to safety recalls due to dangerous defects. The suit covers cars, trucks, motorcycles, and motor homes, and claims the FTC did not require dealers to submit the vehicles to the recalls or fix the defects; they only had to disclose the vehicles "may" be subject to recalls, even when the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration had already required a safety recall. You can read the full lawsuit below.

A local wine bar is taking the president to court. Or at least trying to. Cork Wine Bar in Washington, D.C. is suing President Donald Trump, claiming his continued ownership of the Trump International Hotel constitutes unfair competition under District of Columbia law.

The lawsuit claims that even though Trump placed control of his business interests to his adult sons, he continues to benefit from ownership of the hotel and that customers looking to curry favor with the new administration have left Cork for Trump International. You can see the full lawsuit below.