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Top 7 Crowdfunding Tips for Small Business

Getting the money to start your small business is never easy. Or maybe you need cash to expand or take advantage of a new market or idea. Either way, you might be seeing the success of GoFundMe, Indiegogo, and Kickstarter campaigns and wondering if crowdfunding is the way to go.

Before you begin your crowdfunding campaign (or if you've already started), consider these legal ins and outs of crowdfunding for small business:

1. Crowdfunding vs. Small Business Loan

Before you start crowdfunding, are you sure it's the right move for your business? Weigh the pros and cons of crowdfunding against getting a small business loan from a bank first.

2. Legal Tips for Planning Your Crowdfunding Campaign

Obviously you want to kick your funding off on the right foot. Make sure you know who you can advertise your offering to, and how.

3. SEC Proposes New Crowdfunding Rules

Along with regulating how you can advertise your crowdfunding campaign, the SEC can limit how much you can raise from investors per year, how much each investor can put in, and much more.

4. Crowdsourcing Your Invention? 3 Legal Tips That Can Pay Off

What if you're still at the conceptual stage of your small business? Can crowdfunding get your sky high idea off the ground?

5. Crowdfunding Favors Female Entrepreneurs: Study

The glass ceiling is real, but female small business owners may have an advantage when it comes to raising money.

6. Is Kickstarter or Crowdfunding Money Taxable Income?

If your crowdfunding campaign is a success, don't sabotage that good fortune by failing to pay taxes on the money you raise. Learn the ins and outs of that tax liability here.

7. What to Do When Your Kickstarter Fails

Crowdfunding isn't for everyone. And if it doesn't work for your small business, that doesn't mean you're out of options.

If you're looking for crowdfunding to raise capital for your small business, you may want to talk to an experienced commercial attorney first.

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