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Trump Nominates Former AG William Barr for AG

By George Khoury, Esq. on December 07, 2018 11:46 AM

When it comes to the qualifications of the President Donald Trump's latest appointment, attorney William Barr for Attorney General, there's very little doubt Barr has the right background. After all, not only is he a lawyer, he already served as the United States Attorney General from 1991 to 1993 under the first Bush administration.

Notably, Barr is indeed still considered a conservative and Republican, which is clearly no surprise as he was nominated by President Trump. Additionally, in terms of his own policy beliefs, it is believed that he supports strong presidential-powers, which as nearly every pundit would admit, is a key issue for the Trump administration.

Background of Barr?

Barr attended Columbia University (where both of his parents worked) for his undergraduate, and went on to attend George Washington Law School, graduating in 1977. Interestingly, before and during law school, Barr worked for the CIA. After law school, he clerked on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, then a few years later worked on domestic policy matters in the Reagan administration.

In the late 80s and early 90s, Barr served the Bush administration as an Assistant, and then Deputy, Attorney General. In 1991, when AG Thornburgh resigned, Barr was named acting AG, before being properly nominated and confirmed.

Why William Barr?

Likely for President Trump, William Barr's nomination was motivated by several reasons. Policy wise, Barr subscribes to a tough on crime, pro-prison, tough on immigration, pro-life, brand of conservatism.

In addition to policy reasons, the fact that Barr has been through the confirmation process before for the same position makes it very unlikely that the process will be nearly as controversial as the recent SCOTUS confirmation hearings.

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