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Will More Millennials Take In House Jobs?

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By George Khoury, Esq. on December 14, 2017 6:00 AM

It shouldn't come as much of a surprise that as more Millennials enter law school, more Millennials will be seeking and taking every type of legal job out there. After all, Millennials have now beaten baby boomers as America's largest generation, and they are entitled enough to enter one of the worst legal job markets in U.S. history.

To that end, the number of lawyer Millennials that will be disappointed by their careers is bound to be astronomical. If we believe the results of a somewhat recent survey of one "prominent" corporate legal recruiter, close to 19 percent of Millennial lawyers see themselves working in house in the next decade. Nevertheless, it stands to reason that more Millennials are working in house now than ever before, especially with how young startup culture has made the business leaders of today.

Survey Says ...

Interestingly, the survey also found that just over a third of Millennial lawyers see themselves making partner at their current firm, while just under 10% see themselves being a partner at another firm. A large majority of the survey respondents that saw themselves going in house over the next decade expressed interest in doing so partly for the increased work/life balance in house counsel allegedly enjoy. Over half of these respondents also expressed interest in becoming a business decision maker.

Lending further doubt to these survey results is the fact that two-thirds of the respondents were either confident or very confident that they would actualize. Less than a third were unsure, while only 5% were doubtful. These confidence ratings are a stark reminder that the survey results don't reflect what will happen in reality, but rather only what these Millennial lawyers hope to achieve.

After all, it's only a survey, and if Family Feud has taught us anything, it's that the survey is not always right, but it's usually, at least, interesting.

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