Skip to main content

Are you a legal professional? Visit our professional site

Please enter a legal issue and/or a location
Begin typing to search, use arrow keys to navigate, use enter to select

Whistleblower 101 and Other Lessons for Corporate Counsel

By William Vogeler, Esq. on June 20, 2018 6:57 AM

Edward Siedle is a voice in the whistleblower wilderness, only louder because he toots his own horn.

In his biographical sketch, he portrays himself as having the largest SEC whistleblower award in history. Seidle makes a case for teaching whistleblower justice in law schools. If it doesn't take there, perhaps corporate counsel can learn from the school of Seidle.

School of Seidle

In his latest contribution to Forbes, Seidle explains why he has never made a contribution to his alma mater. Basically, he faults his former law school for shying away from his call to become a whistleblower.

"I was crestfallen when, after relating my experience grappling with high-level corporate lawlessness, the professor indicated s/he was neither sympathetic to, nor willing to help my cause," he wrote. "I was treated as if my request was improper, or unethical."

That was decades ago, and times have changed. As Seidle points out in his article, several law schools -- such as Cornell and Northwestern -- have whistleblower courses.

He did not say whether he contributed to those law schools, however.

Corporate Contributions

In any case, corporate counsel are learning how to change a culture that once discouraged whistleblowers.

At New York University Law School, for example, professors from across the country spoke at a conference last year on whistleblowing inside law firms, government and corporations.

Not to toot our own horn, but FindLaw says corporate attorneys should "implement and follow through on a sound whistleblower policy within their company."

Related Resources:

You Don’t Have To Solve This on Your Own – Get a Lawyer’s Help

Meeting with a lawyer can help you understand your options and how to best protect your rights. Visit our attorney directory to find a lawyer near you who can help.

Or contact an attorney near you:
Copied to clipboard

Find a Lawyer

More Options