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FindLaw's Top 5 Facebook Posts of the Month: May 2018

Maybe it was the pace of the news cycle, or maybe we've all got a little case of senior-itis, looking forward to summer, but the month of May seemed to fly by. But the biggest news of the month didn't go unnoticed by our followers on social media.

FindLaw has amazing Facebook and Twitter communities, and when we post the biggest legal stories, they let us know which ones matter the most to them. So, which stories were our Facebook followers engaging with the most this May? Here's a look:

1. McDonald's Quarter Pounder Lawsuit

At first glance, you might think McDonald's customers were upset at the amount of meat they were getting on their burgers, but it's a little sillier than that. Apparently, the Quart Pounder comes with cheese, and you now have to request no cheese if you don't want it on there. Oh, and you still pay for the cheese you don't get. Hence a class action lawsuit claiming the chain has been "unjustly enriched."

2. U.S. 'Net Neutrality' Rules Will Expire on June 11: FCC

The battle over net neutrality rages on. The FCC earlier this month set a date for Obama-era open-internet rules to expire. A week later, the Senate voted to reinstate them. Needless to say, you haven't heard the end of this issue.

3. Slip and Fall Accidents

From a simple slip in a grocery store to a fatal fall down a flight of stairs, these accidents can be dangerous, and even deadly. And if it happened in California, we have the information you need.

4. Manhattan DA Passes on Minor Marijuana Charges

As states around the country are rewriting their reefer statutes, municipalities are changing the way they charge and prosecute pot laws as well. And small-time marijuana charges in the Big Apple aren't leading to big criminal cases anymore.

5. Federal Judge Says Trump Can't Block Twitter Users

Our Tweeter-in-Chief has been pretty prolific on the social media platform, but not everyone can see his tweets. A federal judge advised President Trump that blocking users from his account is unconstitutional, but has he unblocked those users or refrained from blocking others since the ruling?

Many of you might not have known we're on Facebook, so like our Consumer Facebook page to follow the latest legal development and engage with us on the biggest, and sometimes weirdest, legal stories.

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