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FindLaw's New 5in5 Podcast: The Five Biggest Legal Cases in Just Five Minutes

We've all got our podcast libraries by now that can save us during our daily commutes, distance runs, or even dishwashing at night. You might have some comedy casts to brighten your day, a couple sports shows for scores and analysis, and maybe some long-form stories to give you a longer view of a particular person or topic. But where are you getting your legal news from?

Starting this week, you can get it from FindLaw, the leading provider of online legal information for consumers and small businesses. We've just launched our 5in5 Podcast, a lightning quick five minutes recapping the most important, amusing, or outrageous recent legal decisions.

Gimme 5!

Hosted by our Business Lead for Cases and Codes, Jeremy Winston Conrad, FindLaw's "5 Cases in 5 Minutes" gives you all the essential information from the latest court rulings or jury verdicts. Conrad, who has practiced criminal and immigration defense (and even founded and operated a nonprofit serving the needs of refugees), brings a keen legal eye to a variety of cases, distilling what can be very esoteric topics down for easy digestion. And if you're looking for a deeper dive into the details and reasoning behind the decision, he provides links in the show notes to the cases discussed, as well as other FindLaw resources.

Finding the podcast is easy. You can head to main 5in5 homepage, where you can stream the show itself and see the background links. You can also find it wherever you get your podcasts from -- iTunes, Stitcher, and TuneIn -- and we'll be adding more accessibility in the future, on Google Play and elsewhere. And, as always, you can follow our Twitter feed and Facebook page for updates on the latest episodes, which will be dropping every Friday.

5 for Fighting

So, what did "5 Cases in 5 Minutes" start with first?

  1. Experian Information Solutions, Inc. v. Nationwide Marketing Services, Inc.: Which held that lists of names with addresses deserve some copyright protection (but not as much as James Joyce's Ulysses);
  2. Juarez v. Wash Depot Holdings, Inc.: Where the court failed to enforce an arbitration agreement because of a discrepancy in the English and Spanish versions of the company handbook;
  3. Hassell v. Bird: Finding that Yelp can't be ordered to remove defamatory reviews;
  4. Davidson v. U.S.: A $3.5 million copyright infringement ruling against the United States Postal Service for using a picture of a Las Vegas Statute of Liberty replica rather than the real thing; and
  5. Brown v. Smith: Which dismissed a challenge to California's law that eliminated a previously existing "personal beliefs" exemption from mandatory immunization requirements for school children.

And what's next? You'll just have to log on, tune in, and download or stream Friday's podcast to find out!