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Mommy Dearest II: Verdict in Mom/Son Harassment Case

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By Tanya Roth, Esq. on June 01, 2010 12:45 PM

When last we left Denise New and her son Lane, Mother New had been charged by the local DA for harassment after hacking into her son's Facebook page and leaving comments which he at the time described as, "involv(ing) slander and personal facts about my life." On May 27, Denise New was convicted of misdemeanor harassment and ordered not to have further contact with her son.

Although many teens might think this sounds like the best outcome possible, both mother and son testified during trial that at one point they had a good relationship, until it devolved into charges of harassment and a conviction for mommy dearest. According to the report by the Associated Press, Clark County District Judge Randy Hill sentenced the defendant to a $435 fine, a 30-day suspended jail sentence and the required completion of anger-management and parenting classes. After she completes the classes, the judge would consider allowing Ms. New to see her 17 year-old son again.

During sentencing, Judge Hill took particular exception to New's attempts at parental supervision by leaving statements on Lane's Facebook page which implied he was "a liar" and by the "vulgarities" in messages left on his cell phone. Although her attempts at motherhood may leave quite a bit to be desired, Denise New certainly demonstrates an admirable familiarly with the technology all the "kids" are using these days. The judge however, seems to want New to use this knowledge in a more constructive manner.

"You said you were trying to teach him a lesson," Judge Hill asked regarding the elder New's phone messages. "Were you trying to teach him it's OK to use foul language? Nobody has the right to talk to anybody else like that."

According to the AP, New testified that the vulgarities she used in the Facebook postings and the cell-phone messages reflected the relaxed relationship she had once had with her son. Such language was common in everyday joking between the two of them, she said. But the judge called it "totally, completely inappropriate."

Put that on your page and post it.

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