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Can the Courts Save This Dog From Being Euthanized?

You've heard of stays of execution for people on death row, but did you know a court could step in and put the brakes on the euthanasia process for a dog? That's what one woman is hoping for as she fights to keep her dog alive, despite what the local animal shelter has in store for the pooch.

How to Sue an Online Business

These days, more and more people live their lives online -- chatting with friends, stalking an ex, trolling a public figure, and shopping for ... everything. So, it makes sense that more and more of our conflicts will also have some web-based aspect to them. And while you may know how to sue your neighbor, or the business down the street, what happens when you have a problem with someone you've only dealt with over the internet? There are a few things to keep in mind when it comes to suing an online business.

When Is It Too Late to Go to Small Claims Court?

Your small claims lawsuit should be filed as soon as reasonably possible. And by 'reasonably possible,' we really mean as soon as you're sure you need to sue but before the time limit for filing expires. Besides the practical considerations of suing fairly quickly after something has happened, there are legal reasons to do so.

When to Use Mediation for Elder Abuse

Mediation and litigation are two different ways to resolve legal disputes. While mediation is often a part of litigation, it doesn't always have to be. Disputes can be mediated outside of litigation and lawsuits.

There are pluses and minuses for either choice, and either can be the better option depending on the case. If you're in the midst of an elder abuse case, you may be wonder which one is right for you?

Ohio Lethal Injection Execution Method Ruled Constitutional

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit has upheld the constitutionality of Ohio's lethal injection protocol. In a unanimous ruling, a three judge panel upheld the district court's previous decision denying death-row inmates Raymond Tibbetts and Alva Campbell their request to enjoin their pending executions. It's the latest case in a string of stories concerning the state's method of execution.

Can I Sue the Court?

There are some classic threats you hear regarding legal arguments. "You're getting sued!" "I'll see you in court!" "I'm taking my case all the way to the Supreme Court!" But what if your beef is with a judge or the court itself? Can you take the court to court?

While courts and judges generally enjoy immunity from civil lawsuits, there may still be ways to hold them accountable for certain actions. Here's what you need to know about suing the court.

It's one thing to check in to an unkempt hotel room, finding hair and dirt on the sheets. It's another to be forced to clean the room yourself, because there's no staff around to answer complaints about the condition of the room, or to fix the broken air conditioner or shower in the bathroom. And it's quite another to be charged $350 for calling the overnight number trying to get something fixed, and then threatened with a libel lawsuit by the hotel's lawyer/owner after leaving a negative review online.

That's why the Indiana Attorney General's office stepped in and filed a lawsuit against the Abbey Inn in Nashville, Indiana, charging it with violating the state's Deceptive Consumer Sales Act.

In order to present a case, attorneys need evidence. That evidence may take the form of witness testimony, documents, or physical evidence, and that evidence must be presented in court. But not all evidence is easily obtainable or voluntarily makes its way into court. And for those instances, courts have subpoena power.

A subpoena is a court order to produce documents or testify in court or other legal proceeding, and, as evidenced by its Latin translation "under penalty," those who defy valid subpoenas risk civil or criminal penalties. So is there any way to avoid complying with a subpoena?

What Is Prejudgment Interest?

When you win your court case, you will generally receive monetary damages. Damages come in a few different forms, such as those meant to pay back medical bills and those meant to compensate for lost wages or pain and suffering.

In a court case, a party seeking a judgment, or a monetary award, can also be entitled to prejudgment interest if they win. Prejudgment interest is essentially additional money that a court can award based on the interest that the judgment would have earned over the period of time from when the claimant was entitled to receive those monies.

Remember Seth Rogen's character in Pineapple Express? No, he wasn't a butler -- he was a process server, an obscure yet essential part of the legal system tasked with delivering the bad news of a lawsuit to the person being sued. After all, if people don't know they're being haled into court, it's kind of hard to defend themselves.

Because service of process is the necessary first step to a lawsuit, many think if they can just avoid the process server for long enough, they can't be sued (hence Rogen's disguises). But is that true?