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Most of us have one or two secrets. After all, isn't that what incognito internet browsing is for? Some of these can be as innocent as a couple indecent websites, while others can be criminal convictions, hidden assets, or illegitimate children. And past skeletons in your closet can affect future legal cases.

Your lawyer will likely ask you to give her all relevant information about your case. But when do you need to bring skeletons out of your closet and into your lawyer's office?

Some of us are chronic procrastinators. And those that aren't get things done ahead of time because they know exactly when their time is up. Either way, it helps to have an idea when it's too late to get something done, legally speaking. And those deadlines (and related legal requirements) can vary depending on what it is you're trying to do.

So, here's a list of legal deadlines, from our "When Is It Too Late..." archives:

5 Questions to Ask a Lawyer Before Retirement

Some of us dream about the day we get to retire, others dread it. Either way, you've got to plan for it. Maybe you want to travel. Perhaps you'd like to keep working a little while collecting your pension. Or maybe you're so in debt that you think you'll have to work until the day you die. Whatever your situation, here are five important questions to ask a lawyer before retirement. After all, the better you plan, the more likely you are to have peace of mind both now and after you retire.

Convincing an Attorney to Take Your Case

The idea that attorneys are all chomping at the bit to take any case they can get their hands on is not exactly accurate. While there are some super desperate lawyers out there, most have to be fairly discerning about taking cases they think they can win and maintaining a workable caseload. So, you may find that the first few attorneys you talk to aren't as intrigued by your case as you are. Here are a few tips to keep in mind when trying to convince an attorney to take your case.

Tips for Talking to a Lawyer on the Phone

Almost everyone knows that you have a right to counsel if you've been charged with a crime. People will also be inclined to seek out a lawyer if they want to file a lawsuit, or if they're being sued. But, there are many other instances where a lawyer can be very helpful.

For example, it's usually a good idea to consult with a lawyer while planning your estate because he or she can ensure that your estate plan is in compliance with your state's laws, and can advise you on how to reduce your estate taxes. But, how do you decide when to call an attorney? And how do you decide if the attorney you call is right for you? These are valid and important questions to ask yourself when you're thinking about hiring an attorney. Read on for some tips for talking to a lawyer on the phone.

We know an apple a day keeps the doctor away, and even then, we know regular checkups with our doctor are healthy. We go to the dentist every six months (or at least we should) to make sure our teeth are clean and we don't have cavities. It's easy to understand the value of preventative medicine, but what about preventative legal advice.

Too often, we wait until a crisis before talking to an attorney, and, in many cases, by then it might be too late. Instead, try to avert a legal crisis by having an annual checkup with your lawyer.

When we go to an attorney's office, we pretty much expect that the billing clock will start ticking as soon as everyone sits down. Aside from an initial consultation or contingency fee arrangement, most lawyers aren't in the business of giving their time and advice for free.

But what if your lawyer comes to you? Or needs to go somewhere to view evidence or take a deposition? Is she billing you for the time spent in transit? And does travel time cost the same as legal research or court time?

The sale of a home is a complex business transaction, in and of itself. Doing business with family members can be fraught with complications. Naturally then, selling a home to a family member is both complex and complicated.

In addition to the potential emotional baggage and turmoil that can get wrapped up in a business deal or transaction between family members, there may be legal issues as well. Here are five legal tips on how to avoid the complications that come with selling a home to a family member.

It happens everyday. People get arrested and put in jail. Sometimes it’s for something serious and a person will be locked up for months or years. Sometimes it’s only an overnight stay or a few days. But for friends and family of someone who seems to just disappear, if after checking local hospitals doesn’t turn up anything, checking with police and the jails should be the next step.

If you are concerned that a friend, family member or loved one has been arrested or incarcerated, you may be wondering how you can find out. Thanks to the internet, it has become much simpler in nearly every jurisdiction to find out if and where someone has been taken into custody, incarcerated or imprisoned.

Restraining orders are excellent tools to help victims of domestic violence, harassment, or crime stay protected against future harm. However, restraining orders are not appropriate in every scenario they are requested. In most situations, fighting a restraining order will be very difficult if there is good evidence against the person whom restraint is sought against.

When there is no good evidence, then it's possible to fight a restraining order. However, if you are facing a restraining order hearing, it would be wise to contact a qualified attorney as there may be more at stake than you realize.

It's important to note that laws can vary from state to state. Laws can even vary within a state from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

Below are 3 tips on how to fight a restraining order.