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Man Stole Woman's Phone, Sent Lewd Video to Her Family, Friends

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By Andrew Chow, Esq. on September 18, 2012 9:01 AM

It wasn't "drunk dialing" but rather drunk sexting and drunk Facebook-posting that got an alleged cell phone thief caught, literally, with his pants down.

Anthony Casey, 29, of New Albany, Ind., was arrested after he failed to show up in court on felony theft and misdemeanor obscenity charges, the local News and Tribune reports.

The sordid tale begins at a bar in New Albany, Ind., across the river from Louisville, Ky., where a woman had left her purse. When she returned for it, her cell phone was gone, according to a police affidavit.

Later, the victim was shocked by a disturbing post on her Facebook page: a video clip of a man doing something obscene with his private parts.

The victim's cell phone contacts -- i.e., her family and friends -- received the same clip. So did the principal and other faculty members at a school where the victim worked.

Armed with graphic knowledge that the alleged thief was using her cell phone (indeed, in ways she could never have imagined), the victim sent text messages to her own stolen phone.

The thief texted back with his apologies, and said he'd give the phone back. The victim called police, who helped to retrieve the phone from Casey's house.

"I asked him why he took [the victim's] cell phone, and he stated that he was extremely intoxicated and did not mean to," the police affidavit states. Casey also claimed to have "blacked out" from drinking too much, and didn't recall making his allegedly obscene video.

Sounds like Anthony Casey was voluntarily intoxicated when he allegedly stole the phone and made the video clip, which unfortunately for him is not a defense. But if someone had drugged him or forced him to become intoxicated against his will, that could potentially have worked as a defense in court.

Casey now has a court date next month, and the victim has her phone back. For her own benefit, she may want to think about locking it with a password -- or getting it disinfected.

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