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Fla. Woman Stabs Boyfriend After Dog Eats Her Marijuana

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By Betty Wang, JD on October 25, 2013 3:20 PM

A dog eats marijuana; a woman allegedly stabs her boyfriend. Ah, just another day in our favorite Sunshine State.

A Florida woman accused of stabbing her boyfriend told authorities that the injuries occurred only after his dog swallowed her stash of pot. To bolster her defense, Shadae Scott, 26, of Dania Beach, also claimed her beau repeatedly walked into her knife, United Press International reports.

What was she smoking? Oh wait, that's right.

Domestic Battery Alleged

Scott's boyfriend, Kevin Wiggins, now has small knife cuts on his face and head, with one large gash across his hand, UPI reports. Scott was arrested on a domestic battery charge, a form of domestic violence.

Under Florida law, domestic violence is found when any type of violence (in this case, battery) is committed against a family or household member like a spouse.

In Florida, this also applies to ex-spouses and individuals who are cohabitating or have cohabitated with the accused attacker. So for Scott's domestic battery charge, prosecutors will have to prove that Wiggins and Scott were living together, or had done so in the past.

Dog Eating Drugs Is Not a Defense

Assuming that Wiggins didn't actually walk into Scott's knife multiple times (a pretty fair assumption to make), does Scott have any other potential defenses available to her?

Some common defenses to domestic violence include self-defense and false allegations. Both seem unlikely to apply to Scott in this case, however.

Also unfortunately for Scott, the fact that her marijuana was eaten by Wiggins' dog also isn't a valid defense.

Still, the dog's appetite for pot may have been a godsend -- otherwise, Scott could potentially have faced charges of drug possession as well. Medicinal marijuana is currently not legal in the state of Florida.

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