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#Basta Branding: Can You Be Like Mike?

Did you always want to be a little bit more like Mike? Were you disappointed when you discovered it took more than some really sweet shoes?

If you're a lawyer who consumes any sort of news media, you might actually want to be more like Michael Avenatti. You know, that 47-year-old lawyer who considers himself a "dragon slayer" and happens to be representing Stormy Daniels.

Regardless of your partisan beliefs, it's simply hard to deny that he is a media savvy attorney that certainly knows how to work an audience and create a brand for himself. Have you seen the hashtag #Basta? That's him. We are not the first ones to notice how good he is at this, not by any stretch of the imagination. For those lawyers who can set aside their partisan bifocals, stepping back and taking an objective look at how Avenatti does it could help you learn to work the media, or maybe even land some high profile work of your own.

Are Your Clients "On Brand"?

One of the things that is clear from Avenatti's #Basta brand, is that he seeks to fight for those who have suffered injustice. Basta means enough in Italian. His social media is geared toward informing and rallying people about politically charged topics.

From what's been written about his past clientele, his branding arguably matches, despite some big law roots. Simply put, some of his past clients are people who had "enough." And when you take a step back, the current debacle that has unfolded is a result of Stormy Daniels' contract dispute. It's not only epic that a NDA dispute has blown up like this, it has allowed him to rally "the American people" into his camp of people who have had "enough." And if you think that his media presence isn't good for his client, think again: Crowdsourced funding has put over a half million dollars into the Stormy Daniels litigation fund (which is actually in jeopardy).

Trial by Media

In today's political climate, the court of public opinion can be just as important as any other (just ask Rudy Giuliani). Avenatti knows this, and deliberately delivers what media audiences want to see: theatrics. He has engaged in name calling on television, and isn't afraid to cast aspersions, nor stir the pot in other ways ... that is, so long as he sees a benefit to his client. While it may sound personal at times, for Avenatti, it's his business.

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