Skip to main content

Are you a legal professional? Visit our professional site

Search for legal issues
For help near (city, ZIP code or county)
Please enter a legal issue and/or a location
Begin typing to search, use arrow keys to navigate, use enter to select

Is the Definition of Retirement Changing?

Article Placeholder Image
By William Vogeler, Esq. on July 25, 2018 6:57 AM

If you didn't know it already, this is not your father's retirement.

A generation ago "retirement" meant trading the nine-to-five for bingo numbers. Today, nobody plays bingo anymore.

At least not lawyers. As we hit the "retirement" age, we re-purpose our lives. Here are the real-life numbers:

50-60 Somethings

Remember when 55 was the retirement age? Ha ha ha ha ha.

Now it's a speed limit. It's a measurement of how fast retirement options are catching up to us.

According to retirement studies, almost everybody in their 50s has made retirement saving their No. 1 priority. That's because most will be working into their 60s. Eighty-two percent, to be precise, are working or expect to work past age 65.

That's not necessarily a bad thing. After all, what lawyer doesn't relish the opportunity to do discovery and billables for the rest of his, her, or questioning life?

Re-Directing Life

Jill Switzer, writing for Above the Law, looks at it this way: JOMO or the Joy of Missing Out.

She means we should enjoy leaving the law behind, while re-directing our legal skills to other endeavors. After all, there are at least 99 things you can do with a law degree.

Besides playing bingo.

Have an open position at your law firm? Post the job for free on Indeed, or search local candidate resumes.

Related Resources:

FindLaw has an affiliate relationship with Indeed, earning a small amount of money each time someone uses Indeed's services via FindLaw. FindLaw receives no compensation in exchange for editorial coverage.

Find a Lawyer

More Options